Enterprise 2.0

IT skills CIOs will look for in 2009

Check out Computerworld's list of the nine hottest IT skills for 2009. Do you have what it takes to keep your consulting business thriving through 2009?

 Computerworld recently published a list of most sought after IT skills in 2009. According to the article, CIOs will be looking to retrain in-house staff rather than rely on consultants where possible in 2009. That doesn't have to mean bad news for consultants -- we can remain competitive by offering the skills companies need the most. Computerworld writer Thomas Hoffman says CIOs will be looking for specific skills; market those skills to current and prospective clients, and your 2009 calendar should be full.

Take a look at Computerworld's list of the nine most sought after IT skills in 2009:

#1: Programming/application development, with an emphasis on SAP and .NET

#2: Help desk/technical support -- Unfortunately, this is something that is not well suited to consulting, although you could dedicate a single employee to this function and offer that service to several clients.

#3: Project management, which means your promotional materials might need a tune-up. Make sure prospective clients know that you can meet deadlines and budgets.

#4: Networking

#5: Business intelligence -- BI and IT are definitely blending.

#6: Security

#7: Web 2.0

#8: Data center, with virtualization taking a front seat

#9: Telecommunications

My primary skills lie in #1, #2, #3, and #5. I'm surprised to see Web 2.0 on this list -- has it really become so popular? Small to medium-size companies certainly aren't utilizing it. The one skill I want to push in 2009 is virtualization. It'll be a big help to small and medium-size clients who need to grow but don't have the budget for it. If you can show a prospective client how to save money, while paying your fee, you can be an exception to the in-house trend.

Do you agree with Computerworld? What skills do you think your clients will clamor for in 2009?

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About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

11 comments
Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

The HR muppets are looking for someone with twenty years experience in every tech ever invented backed up by certs with a doctorate, about twenty years old who'll work for $10 an hour.... As usual

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

I think the list is too general to be generally applicable (paradoxically). For instance, my clients will be looking for programming skills, yes -- but no SAP. .NET will probably continue to grow this year for me, although I try to discourage it. Web 2.0 is growing slowly -- since my clients are software vendors, they're expected to have an up-to-date web presence. Which means, at the very least, a blog.

bcgreaves
bcgreaves

I just don't understand how anyone gets hired with the HR folks running the show? Give me someone who is eager and willing to learn regardless of their age and experience over 1000 years experience and a doctorate. The latter are the ones that create a lot of inner office crap.

yonas.tesema
yonas.tesema

I second Tony Hopkins' statement. HR as well as Hiring Managers are looking for people with Doctorate/Masters degree with 20 years of Technology (CISCO, MICROSOFT, Virtualization, Security experience and want to pay you 20/hr. IS this because the Supply outweigh the demand? I understand companies are laying off the hard working employees left and right. Are we at a point of desperation and work for a penny? How do we make our normal pay back when times improve if we start working for pennies now?

ssharkins
ssharkins

Tony, you made me laugh out loud -- aint that sad?????? :)

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

You'd be lucky to pull down $8/hour with that menial crap ;-)

jck
jck

It's like that over there too??????? I thought it was just American companies/recruiters that were daft plonkers. :^0

ssharkins
ssharkins

Computerworld's list doesn't represent me well, but I readily admit that I'm not on the cutting edge of things. Frankly, I don't see things changing much for me. However, I do plan to make more cost-saving recommendations. I identified more with the list in Do you have the consulting skills IT managers want? That list has a broader scope and isn't limited to strictly technical skills.

PMPsicle
PMPsicle

and here I thought he was serious!

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

otherwise you'd cry. CIOs recruiting, a top level manager may be. May be a quick check of a candidate already deemed suitable. Pouring over resumes doing a buzzword count, I don't think so...

z_s
z_s

For the clients I handle on a steady basis the primary needs haven't been to keep them on the cutting edge; as much as it has been to keep them in the black. If I can spot ways to save money and still keep their office running smoothly, then those customers are the happiest. This next year isn't going to be about "expansion" as much as it is going to be about survival. The IT Consultants that can help their customers save money through IT are going to be the ones helping their customers survive - and in turn, surviving themselves. Cutting edge is cool - staying in the black is better.