Software

3D transistors promise to deliver 20 Ghz to 50 Ghz processor speeds

Unisantis Electronics of Japan is teaming with Singapore's Institute of Microelectronics to develop the Surround Gate Transistor (SGT), which could boost processor speeds by 10 to 20 times current limits.

Unisantis Electronics of Japan is teaming with Singapore's Institute of Microelectronics to develop the Surround Gate Transistor (SGT), which could boost processor speeds by 10 to 20 times current limits.

An excerpt from Gizmodo:

Moore's law states that the amount of transistors able to be jam-packed into processors will double every two years or so. But if chip makers are going to keep this up, they're going to have to move beyond the quaint world of two dimensions and into the realm of 3D processors. Masuoka has made a deal with Singapore's Institute of Microelectronics to develop new 3D chip designs, which he will then license through the Singaporean government.

The team is being lead by the CTO of Unistasis, Fujio Masuoka, who is the inventor of flash memory. He claims that the technologies exist today to put into action the concept he proposed 20 years ago.

There are several other technologies that have promised the sky in IC (integrated circuits) innovations. However, the question remains as to when real products will see the light of the day.

More information:

New transistor design may kick off race to 10 GHz (Ars Technica)

Unisantis, Institute of Microelectronics Develop 3D Transistor in Singapore (Huliq)

4 comments
Smart_Neuron
Smart_Neuron

Honestly, it all sounds great ;0) Hardware design has always outpaced software design. However, look at the software in front of you. Is it all seamlessly integrated and bug-free - I think not. Perhaps software companies should be developing more standards bodies and have it all working together first, rather than writing garbage. Today's computing, in my opinion, is more like the CB Radio craze during the 1980's - more power, upgrading hardware, tuning, etc. Only this time it will not go away!

mjd420nova
mjd420nova

It was only a matter of time before they began stacking layers of elements on top of each other and using electron streams to cut the junctions. It seemed the only logical approach. In the early 80's they found that using electron mocroscopes to look at the chip elements was blowing holes in the samples so it seemed the next approach would be to use that beam to do the actual fabrication of the elements.

HypnoToad72
HypnoToad72

Now Vista has its share of problems, and seeing how 1GB is always in use by the OS is blood curdling, but it ran well enough on: AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ 2GB DDR400 RAM 300GB HD Nvidia 7900 video card Runs spectacular on Intel Q6600 4GB DDR2-800 RAM 320GB HD Nvidia 8800GTS video Plus, Vista has some nice features too... though don't ask why Microsoft won't use encrypted USB dongles to store serial number/activation code when they want people to use USB flash drives that contain encrypted serial number/activation code for Bitlocker... :)

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