Linux

Adobe announces AIR to much fanfare, but the mobile applications space is already crowded

The mobile application space got a little more crowded on February 25th as Adobe introduced its Adobe Integrated Runtime (AIR) software, a development environment that allows applications to be designed to run on virtually any device.

The mobile application space got a little more crowded on February 25th as Adobe introduced its Adobe Integrated Runtime (AIR) software, a development environment that allows applications to be designed to run on virtually any device. The product currently supports Mac and PC, with Linux support in Alpha testing and smart phone support on the horizon. Still, the market is crowded with similar offerings from Microsoft, Mozilla, Sun, and Google.

Adobe Blurs Line Between PC and Web (New York Times)

Adobe CTO: AIR for Linux due later this year (InfoWorld)

AIR has the potential to help Linux machines receive rich Internet applications and also shows promise internally in organizations. FedEX is using AIR for tracking packages internally and Salesforce.com has provided a toolkit for developers writing apps for its platform.

Blogging Adobe's AIR rollout (News.com blogs)

I could see many benefits in my business (education) in being able to access applications and data from devices ranging from cell phones to full-fledged computers. We could more efficiently register students if our faculty advisors could use handheld computers or PDAs, or if we could simply loan the devices to students who do not need the help of an advisor. Will your business use AIR-based applications or products from one of the competitors?

1 comments
Andy Moon
Andy Moon

AIR applications seem to have appeared overnight. Do you think that your business could improve productivity by using applications that allow access to data, no matter where it is stored, from anywhere in the world?