Emerging Tech

AdSense ad-heavy sites swept away in Google late spring cleaning


Blogosphere rumors percolated earlier this month of Google’s eighty-sixing alleged news sites which were really ad farms.

Criteria for continued news source indexing were revealed as:

  • Offer information updated regularly
  • Organizational, not individual, management, with organizational information on site
  • No hate speech or pornography
  • No open content posting without editorial review
  • Website is technically conducive to inclusion

Well, now low-content sites of all kinds will drop off on June 1st, as late last week the Web giant sent termination notices to arbitraging Adsensers, as per CBR Online.

Advertising at its most basic

"Friendly account disablement" messages went to Web sites who bought AdWords for low cost-per-click items, then redirected clickers to ad-heavy sites with AdSense ads for high-cost keywords. This ran afoul of the ban on "pages published specifically for the purpose of showing ads, whether or not the page content is relevant." Arbitrage pages have advertising and little else, and might buy 'watch' in AdSense, then link to ads selling Rolexes ('Rolex' clicks being worth >2x what a 'wrist watch' click might cost).

The NY Post suggested keeping 'click-through' rates high was the heart of the matter. Google's protective of their cred, as other actions this week confirm.

Will these Google-gamers move to Yahoo's Publisher's Network, or will Yahoo get weary of them as well? And, was arbitrage evil per se, or evil per Google? Join the discussion.

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13 comments
K7AAY
K7AAY

Is the process of ad arbitrage evil? After all, what else is a newspaper than a collection of ads with a little news filling (as little, these days, as publishers think they can get away with)? And, will Yahoo take arbitrage biz, or spurn them as well? What do you think?

deepsand
deepsand

Ad arbitrage is inherently bad, in that: 1) It is deliberately deceptive; 2) Invites click fraud; and, 3) Serves only to drive up the costs to those who ultimately supply the goods or services being advertised, which is passed along to the purchaser in the form of higher prices.

mhbowman
mhbowman

It's Google's right to stipulate how their ad program is being used, and further to prevent it's abuse. I love the fact that Google is removing low-content, zero value sites from their rankings. To me, nothing is more annoying than to search the internet only to find a top ranking site that's nothing more than a link directory. The next thing I would like to see is the enforcement and subsequent removal of sites with stolen content to the point of prosecution. There are far to many people using site scrapers to steal another designer's hard work with just a few clicks of a mouse and stealing their revenue in the process.

deepsand
deepsand

you may wish to check out some of the online forums for those invloved in online marketing, site development, search engine optimization, etal.. On that I would recommend is WebProWorld, at http://www.webproworld.com/ . While forum viewing is open to all, you'll need to register (at no cost) in order to participate in the forum discussions, subscribe to discussions, and/or subscribe to newsletters, just like here at TR.

deepsand
deepsand

if so, whether of not your links, outbound & inbound, are relevant to the content of your site. If you're not concerned with Page Rank, then there's no reason to be concerned about links. If you are so concerned, then make sure that your outbound links are to sites whose content has relevancy to yours. Relevancy need not mean that those sites' content is similar to yours, but that it at least compliments yours. For example, if your site sells tickets to an event or events in City X, then links to sites that deal with lodging & dining accommodations for that area, other entertainment & site seeing destinations in the area, etc. would be relevant. As for inbound links, avoid those that are paid for, such as those of link farms. The rest can help your Page Rank if their own PR is higher than yours, but won't hurt you if lower.

ByteBin-20472379147970077837000261110898
ByteBin-20472379147970077837000261110898

I agree! I too am sick of searching for something only to end up at a link directory! It's become very difficult to do research when you spend half your time clicking useless links. :( I wonder though, as I have sites with a link page in with other content, if having link pages isn't a bit of a problem in this day and age? Used to be that was really cool to do way back when the net was brand new (yes, I remember those days!) Now though, we have search engines, and I am thinking that I really don't need to link to anything other than 1. Something that when clicked may generate revenue for my site, 2. Something I am sure my visitors will find VERY useful. Preferably both. Though having your site in someone else's links page is a good thing, you're rubbing the back of the ones you put in your link page, especially if they aren't linking back in return. That said, I think my link page strategy has drastically changed over the years.