After Hours

Amazon to launch Kindle e-book reader

Amazon.com's CEO will unveil the Kindle e-book reader in a high-profile event in New York on Monday. Reportedly delayed so as to "perfect the details," the Kindle will come equipped with a Wi-Fi connection that allows users to purchase electronic books from an Amazon e-book store.

Amazon.com's CEO will unveil the Kindle e-book reader in a high-profile event in New York on Monday. Reportedly delayed so as to "perfect the details," the Kindle will come equipped with a Wi-Fi connection that allows users to purchase electronic books from an Amazon e-book store.

To give it a distinct advantage over other e-book readers and services already on the market, Amazon wanted to have the biggest e-book catalog of any reader available. Indeed, other than the usual hardware challenges, such as battery power, the bigger problem was getting publishers on board.

At the moment, the device will include a feature to download digital editions of The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal each morning

According to CNET ZDNet News:

The company is also said to have forged agreements with somewhere between 50 and 100 newspaper publishers, in addition to the daily New York Times and Wall Street Journal features. Kindle owners are expected to be able to select from a long list of publications for automatic download.

Electronic books, and especially dedicated e-book readers, have failed to catch on the way some predicted they would.

If you recall, Sony unveiled the second edition of its Sony Reader device in October. The original Reader, released in September 2006, proved to be a flop.

Like the "paperless office" pipe dream that remains as elusive as ever, do you think that there is even a demand for a dedicated e-book reader?

What do you reckon are the chances of the Kindle succeeding where all other e-book readers have failed?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

4 comments
paulmah
paulmah

Like the "paperless office" pipe dream that remains as elusive as ever, do you think that there is even a demand for a dedicated e-book reader? Will the Kindle be a bust?

santeewelding
santeewelding

After paper we replace the fabric of our clothing with pixels. Appealing, until the power fails.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Dedicated is serious mistake in my opinion. Some one will figure out how to crack the thing and then there will be a lot more books floating about on P2P. People who read books, want the paper in their hands. If this is an attempt to reach out to a new customer base, then someone f'ed up big. Most people who don't read a lot aren't put off by the fact that they have to turn pages and remember which one they were on! As a dedicated reader, the only thing e-formats offer me is a potentially low cost preview. Now that I could use, considering some of the dross I've been sold disguised as a good book. I'd want to do it on my PC though, not on some limited use extra naff gadget.

Dedlbug
Dedlbug

It's just too funny. Nothing beats physically printed material when it comes to reading...especially something long. (IMO) But if I have to go with reading and technology, I go with audio books. ;)