After Hours

Amazon's Kindle sold out

Amazon's Kindle wireless reading device, which started selling Monday for $399, has quickly sold out due to "heavy customer demand." According to Amazon, it will be in stock again on December 7, 2007.

Amazon's Kindle wireless reading device, which started selling Monday for $399, has quickly sold out due to "heavy customer demand." According to Amazon, it will be in stock again on December 7, 2007.

Excerpt from CNET News.com:

With the Kindle, Amazon is hoping to succeed where hardware companies like Sony have failed. No e-book reader has ever been a market success. The Kindle's battery will last several days to a week, company representatives have said, and, as shipped, it will hold about 200 books.

Of course, we don't know how many units Amazon started off with on Monday in the first place.

In case you're still wondering what the Kindle is, check out Amazon's Kindle product overview.

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

8 comments
CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

$400 will go a long way at the used book store. I don't have to keep recharging batteries with a paper book. I can leave a conventional book in the car without worrying about theft, overheated / chilled electronics, etc. $400 will go a long way at the used book store. I can drop a conventional book in the bathtub and still be able to read it, or at least replace it cheaply. I can stuff a paperback in an Army field uniform pocket and not worry about it breaking or being unable to recharge batteries. $400 will go a long way at the used book store. I can trade in a used book for a new one, or swap it with friends. I don't need web access to read a traditional book. Did I mention $400 will go a long way at the used book store? Edited: I don't have to get an electrical adapter when I take a book overseas.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

nothing to fondle. ;)

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

but not the ones that read it to me.... I can read easier and longer on a monitor that I can flipping pages. When I have to read a book manually, it bugs me cause I cant get comfortable, change font sizes, etc.. When reading on the monitor, if I start to get tired and need to continue, just make everything bigger and its all good again. And, I dont struggle much with getting comfortable.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

how do you get contordedly comfy in the big, ugly easy chair and then read an e-book on your computer? :D

GSG
GSG

I looked at this as I read a lot and buy from amazon quite a bit when I can't find an obscure title at the store. I also buy electronic books on occasion. Why should I pay $400 for a device to read an ebook on when I can buy the book itself, or even buy the ebook and read it on the laptop that I already have? If they were selling the device for say $200 and you got something like 100 free downloads of any book you want, maybe it would be OK, but you're limited on what books come with it and what books you can buy. It's a waste of $400.

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

maybe they are trying to get more illiterate people in the audience, or maybe the blind/partially blind. Kind of hard to read when everything is a blur.... However, I have to agree mostly, as this was probably meant to target people who are too lazy to actually read and/or want to multitask while reading, radio, online, tv, etc...

GSG
GSG

I like holding the book. Yes, the space savings would be awesome since I have over 2,000 books and have them in storage bins, but I just want that paper. Plus it forces me to weed them out and donate them occasionally. At least, the ones that aren't my collectibles get weeded out.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

When record companies first switched from vinyl to CDs, one of their marketing points was a reduced price to the consumer because of reduced production costs. Instead, the prices have remained the same or risen, and the producers are pocketing the difference. Similarly, book publishers would love to see electronic books established in the market place. The Amazon web page describing the Kindle says all books for it will be $9.99. If publishers can eliminate printing and distribution costs, but charge $9.99 for what costs $6.99 in paperback, look at how much the profit margin goes up.

Editor's Picks