Security

Apple keeps mum about critical security fixes

Apple has released security updates for QuickTime and its Java runtime for Macs that rectify a whole bunch of serious security vulnerabilities. In a bizarre twist, the company is not presenting them as a security fix, despite the very real risk posed to millions of affected users.

Apple has released security updates for QuickTime and its Java runtime for Macs that rectify a whole bunch of serious security vulnerabilities. In a bizarre twist, the company is not presenting them as a security fix, despite the very real risk posed to millions of affected users.

According to The Register:

We fired up QuickTime on a PC and promptly received a popup window alerting us that the update "is highly recommended." But nowhere is there any mention of vulnerabilities that can be milked by a cyber criminal halfway around the world. We've yet to install either update on a Mac, but according to this post on Ryan Naraine's Zero Day blog, the Java update similarly omits any mention of security vulnerabilities.

Do you think this failure to plainly warn end users is a simple oversight or a misdirected attempt by Apple not to alarm its user base?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

4 comments
paulmah
paulmah

Do you think this failure to plainly warn end users is a simple oversight, or a misdirected attempt by Apple not to alarm its user base?

rafaelm
rafaelm

Of course they kept mum on purpose. They spend millions advertising that they have a safer OS, so they're not going to go out and say that their OS has security vulnerabilities. I don't think it's misdirected, I think it's flat out dishonest.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

IMO, Apple is as much a 'bully' as is Microsoft. Apple justs manifests it differently, builds a more stable OS, and is perceived as building a safer OS. I think it is an attempt, misguided or not, to avoid potential loss of market share due to the potential for a change in how Apple may be perceived in light of new-found security flaws.

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

I agree! Why not open up the software to allow it to run on any box! There are hacks for it, but let's make it legal to purchase a copy for the average joe who enjoys building pc's. Then let's see how cheaply the masses can build a "Mac" to outperform the genuine article...while retaining that vaunted "reliability".

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