Servers

AS/400 coming to blade servers

Chris Maxcer of the SystemiNetwork journal has stumbled across an entry showing the i5, aka the AS/400, slotting into IBM's BladeCenter racks.

Chris Maxcer of the SystemiNetwork journal has stumbled across an entry showing the i5, aka the AS/400, slotting into IBM's BladeCenter racks.

According to The Register:

The Power-based blades should be a boon for application hosts and loyalists to that much diminished legion, the mid-range/minicomputer server crew. With the HP3000 being end-of-lifed, the iSeries has a collier’s grip on the ancient market.

Does your company still use the AS/400? Just how much of a boon would the availability of AS/400 blades be in your situation?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

5 comments
paulmah
paulmah

Does your company still use the AS/400? Just how much of a boon would a AS/400 blade be in your situation?

seanferd
seanferd

So they still have these in production? Updated even. I have no answer for Paul mah's question (sorry). I was a terminal user on an AS/400 system some years back, and the experience was a poor one. I have no idea what the limits of this system are, but I tend to blame the company for it's lame performance. IT seemed pretty good, they had at least 2 guys with years of programming experience, but I felt the business was run poorly. All we really did was keep track of inventory (fulfillment-type organization), and the system still wasn't entirely real-time when I left. This caused endless headaches, and probably a lot of annoyed customers (and clients). I am curious to know what other folks' experience with an AS/400 is/was like. I hope this sort of dovetails into Paul's question.

warpman999
warpman999

I'm a little bit late to this conversation but here are my 2 cents... The AS/400-iSeries-System i, is doing great thank you. The thing about this system that a lot GUI (win/mac) people fail to notice is that it is one of the most, if not the best, reliable system in the midrange computer market. It is also one of the most secure systems out there today. In regards to applications, you can find all sorts of applications out there today that would work nicely on the system. You want an email server? It can be configure to work as email server? HTTP, DHCP? DNS? ect... this system works with all types of network services. Hardware? The latest systems are running on the latest computer technology out there. I'm sorry to say but I don't think you can even compare a windows server with one of these systems. You'll be quite surprise to find out that tons of companies run these systems, including MS. You don't hear or see them because all you hear about are the famous MS servers. And this is a good thing because it means that the systems are so reliable that you hardly ever hear about one of them breaking down. If you want to find out more about these systems you just need to point to the IBM website and look for System i. This is one of the things I really hate about IBM changing the name from AS/400 to iSeries to System i. However, you will find that most of the midrange people will still call these systems AS400s period. My 2 cents...

amorse
amorse

Yes they are still in production, and from what I can tell still in wide use - although I'll wager its not a high growth part of IBM's business. I am in the manufacturing sector, and many companies still used them including ourselves. A few people in our company use a "Green Screen" client, but most used a web-based java client to interact with the server. We use it for our ERP and payroll packages. It interacts seamlessly with our Windows network, and is rock solid as far as stability and dependability. There is quite an active support community online (in addition to IBM's site), and new applications seem to constantly be developed for the i5 (we are looking at RFID, and there is quite a push for PHP right now). I have noticed that casinos in Vegas, Airlines, and many retail stores also use them. Finally, I believe IBM has had the blade version for several years now. I hope this helps shed some light...

seanferd
seanferd

The AS/400 seems like a good system (I am certainly no expert) and has enjoyed quite a life span. It also seems to be a lot more fault-tolerant than some of the "newer" offerings. I wonder if the designation was changed to i5 in part to avoid the "stigma" sometimes attatched to "older" technology. The company I worked for didn't use RFID, but it did integrate RF barcode scanners into the AS/400 system, rather than the newer Windows network. Servers were also set up so that clients had access to their data via web pages, rather than terminal emulation. Thanks again for helping to satisfy my curiosity.