After Hours

Blu-ray’s BD+ DRM technology cracked

SlySoft, the makers of AnyDVD, has released a new beta of its famous ripping application, which it claims has successfully cracked Blu-ray discs protected by the BD+ DRM technology.

SlySoft, the makers of AnyDVD, has released a new beta of its famous ripping application, which it claims has successfully cracked Blu-ray discs protected by the BD+ DRM technology. This slap in the face came mere months after its official launch.

According to SlySoft: "All available BD+ titles can be copied with AnyDVD ripper or can be watched on HTPC without HDCP using PowerDVD 3104 and AnyDVD."

So much for its "unbreakable" DRM superiority in the format war with HD DVD.

Eric from Ars Technica explains the BD+ DRM technology:

Finalized in June 2007, BD+ uses a small virtual machine that launches when a Blu-ray disc is inserted and runs in the background while the disc is playing in order to keep the disc's content locked down. If it finds evidence of tampering or copying, playback can be disabled. The code is specific to each disc, which is intended to make it more difficult to crack and is erased from memory once the disc is ejected. The end result is an additional layer of protection in addition to the AACS encryption used by both Blu-ray and HD DVD, which was cracked back in April.

Excerpt from SlySoft's official forum post:

Note to Twentieth Century Fox: As you can see, BD+ didn't offer you any advanced security, it just annoyed some of your customers with older players. So could you please cut this crap and start publishing your titles on HD DVD? There are thousands of people willing to give you money.

Unlike when AACS was defeated by the cracking community, SlySoft will keep the BD+ crack under wraps. The company says that it can't afford other developers benefiting from SlySoft's reverse-engineering efforts.

What is your opinion on DRM technologies? Are all DRM schemes, no matter how advanced, doomed to failure?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

7 comments
paulmah
paulmah

What is your opinion on DRM technologies? Are all DRM schemes, no matter how advanced, doomed to failure?

JCitizen
JCitizen

like me; fed up with DRM. It has only enraged me when I was doing legitimate stuff. I am not interested in stealing music; but I will never buy another Sony product since their root kit controversy.

gwalther
gwalther

Copy protection methods have been around since before Commodore and entertained and enlightened many of us with cracking it. Back then they tried to prevent games from being copied, I never played the games but enjoyed breaking the Unbreakable copy protection. Didn't work then, won't work now, won't work in the future, just a flawed way of manufactures trying to protect there high priced intellectual property when a simple price reduction would cure the problem. If it will cost more in time, effort, or money to crack the DRM then it will not be done.

armstrongb
armstrongb

The music industry is moving towards higher quality mp3 releases and large amounts of material are now free of DRM crippled software. I guess the video folks will now go through the same cycle with the same results.

nentech
nentech

If it can be seen or listened to it can be recorded How many so-called unbreakable encryption methods have we seen broken? How many software protection methods have failed to protect I am starting to lose count The best thing they can do is to hide a serial number on each disk Then track that disk If a copy turns up just check the number to see where the original went Then let the law do the rest If its good enough the pirates will never know until the cops are knocking on the door

marahanga
marahanga

I don't know why the choose to spend massive amounts of money, producing such things as DRM, any home PC user can always find steps to achieving what they want, even thought this was harder then the earlier DRM protection, it will always be beaten...

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