After Hours

Blu-ray’s BD+ DRM technology cracked

SlySoft, the makers of AnyDVD, has released a new beta of its famous ripping application, which it claims has successfully cracked Blu-ray discs protected by the BD+ DRM technology.

SlySoft, the makers of AnyDVD, has released a new beta of its famous ripping application, which it claims has successfully cracked Blu-ray discs protected by the BD+ DRM technology. This slap in the face came mere months after its official launch.

According to SlySoft: "All available BD+ titles can be copied with AnyDVD ripper or can be watched on HTPC without HDCP using PowerDVD 3104 and AnyDVD."

So much for its "unbreakable" DRM superiority in the format war with HD DVD.

Eric from Ars Technica explains the BD+ DRM technology:

Finalized in June 2007, BD+ uses a small virtual machine that launches when a Blu-ray disc is inserted and runs in the background while the disc is playing in order to keep the disc's content locked down. If it finds evidence of tampering or copying, playback can be disabled. The code is specific to each disc, which is intended to make it more difficult to crack and is erased from memory once the disc is ejected. The end result is an additional layer of protection in addition to the AACS encryption used by both Blu-ray and HD DVD, which was cracked back in April.

Excerpt from SlySoft's official forum post:

Note to Twentieth Century Fox: As you can see, BD+ didn't offer you any advanced security, it just annoyed some of your customers with older players. So could you please cut this crap and start publishing your titles on HD DVD? There are thousands of people willing to give you money.

Unlike when AACS was defeated by the cracking community, SlySoft will keep the BD+ crack under wraps. The company says that it can't afford other developers benefiting from SlySoft's reverse-engineering efforts.

What is your opinion on DRM technologies? Are all DRM schemes, no matter how advanced, doomed to failure?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

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