After Hours

BMG's chief lawyer declares that making a copy of your own CD is stealing

Ars Technica, which is covering the first actual trial pitting the RIAA against a supposed file-sharing, has a report on the opinion of Jennifer Pariser pertaining to the topic of fair use. Pariser is the head of litigation for Sony BMG and was called to the stand to testify.

Ars Technica, which is covering the first actual trial pitting the RIAA against a supposed file-sharing, has a report on the opinion of Jennifer Pariser pertaining to the topic of fair use. Pariser is the head of litigation for Sony BMG and was called to the stand to testify.

According to Ars, Pariser has a very broad definition of "stealing." When questioned, Pariser suggested that what millions of music fans do is actually theft, including ripping your own CDs or downloading songs that you already own.

Excerpt from the article:

Gabriel [Lead counsel for the record labels] asked if it was wrong for consumers to make copies of music which they have purchased, even just one copy. Pariser replied, "When an individual makes a copy of a song for himself, I suppose we can say he stole a song." Making "a copy" of a purchased song is just "a nice way of saying 'steals just one copy'," she said

I guess that means everyone in Singapore seen with an iPod is a thief then. Since the iTunes Music Store is not available here, they must at the minimum be guilty of ripping their own CDs.

What is your opinion of fair use and copyright where music is concerned? Is the current legal situation in dire need of a complete revamp?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

Editor's Picks