Security

Browser add-on for real-time malware blocking


Haute Secure, a security start-up firm, has introduced a multi-layer approach for real-time malware blocking. Although there are many such products in the market already, none are perfect at arresting malware attacks.

A quote from the article at TechWorld:

"The first layer is a kernel-level driver that looks for and stops executables coming out of the browser.", said Steve Anderson, who heads the company's product strategy. "A second layer blocks the links from which malware is delivered," he added.

The software can be customized to obtain feeds on blacklists from various sources and saves the lists locally for improved speed. Thus blacklists from various other vendors can be incorporated too. The plug-in is available for Internet Explorer (Windows XP and Vista) and the version for Firefox and Safari will be released soon. Download the plug-in, which is free during beta release.

More news sources:

Haute Secure pledges safe searching tool bar for IE (Webware)

Start-up launches free malware blocker (Dark Reading)

9 comments
fatsavage
fatsavage

I took the Haute Secure add on for a test drive at dictionary.reference.com and was warned of 3 blocked programs. Then I went to one of those really nasty sites that all computer users stumble upon and no warnings were issued at all. Don't think I would give it the FatSavage seal of approval.

dougallgood
dougallgood

Reading through the licensing agreement before loading...states that the software is licensed for personal use / non-commerical use.

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

Is it the network card,or the CPU,or the RAM in my computer---?Whatever it is it's no bigger than a megabyte and it has to be protected.

Dipthis
Dipthis

gforsythe provided an excellent analogy of this situation. That said, although your network card, RAM, and CPU are used during access to the web, and all are (typically) bearing less than a megabyte of in-situs memory, there hasn't yet been an exploit which places those components at specific risk. This is likely due to each component having no retention in the memory, but instead flushes clean with the reboot and/or power off/power up cycle. That in mind, each of those components provide a pathway (akin to your driveway versus the internet highway) to storage devices within your computer. The most common destination of the malware (for Win(x) systems) is the hard disk drive used to start the operating system. It thus follows that you are not likely going to see features protecting components at lower than the hard disk drive level. Safe surfing!

gforsythe7
gforsythe7

It all surfs the web. Analogy- It's like asking which part of your car takes you to the mall, it all does... sortof. The motherboard, cpu, ram, etc all work in harmony to run applications such as a web browser. The entire computer communicates with a newtork (other computers) over the network card. The network card and network is like your driveway and the roads. The application categorized as a browser actually "surfs" the internet, there are many, the popular ones being Microsoft IE, Firefox, Opera, mosaic, Netscape, to name a few. This is where your vulnerabilities for the typical user come into play.

ImNotLisa
ImNotLisa

I love this! It's simple and so easy to understand. Wish someone had explained it that way to me a long time ago.

Coss71
Coss71

What do you mean, what part surfs the web? DUH! That is one of the most computer illiterate questions I have seen in a long time. Do you even know what a browser or malware is?

strikeleader
strikeleader

It seems to me that people come to sites like this looking for advice and answers, not to be flamed by arrogance. Like your mother said, ? If you can?t say anything nice, don?t say anything at all.?

onesmellycat
onesmellycat

Indeed, this user seems to have absolutely no clue about browsers or computers, in general, so why don't you stop calling him illiterate and start giving meaningful information?