Mobility

Can you hear me now (from 5.5 miles high)?


On the 54th anniversary of climbing Mt. Everest, it’s fitting to recognize another altitudinous accomplishment; the first cell phone call from that very summit eight days before the anniversary, from a height of 8.85 kilometers (29,035 feet for the metrically challenged). After two phone calls (one to his wife and kids; the other went into a Motorola voice mail box you can listen to), Briton Rod Baber also sent an SMS message (texting in mountain climbing gloves?) on this Symbian phone via a Chinese GSM network.

On the other hand, Blackberry’s plumbing new depths; RIM’s new color CDMA/GSM 8830 World Edition works on EDVO, 1xRTT and IS-95B for data and voice in North America, plus GPRS/GSM in the rest of the world; but, the phone was deliberately crippled. The GSM radio within can’t work on the 800MHz and 1900MHz North American cellular frequencies, even though the CDMA radio can, and does, a deliberate design 'feature.'

If you’re in North America on Sprint, Verizon, Bell Mobility, or other CDMA providers, how much do you like having a phone you can’t use overseas? Join the discussion.

3 comments
K7AAY
K7AAY

If you?re in North America on Sprint, Verizon, Bell Mobility or other CDMA providers, how much do you like having a phone you can?t use overseas?

DadsPad
DadsPad

On a Chinese GSM network, Hmmm. Also, I notice that Europe gets a lot of the new cool phones. I see cell phones everywhere in the USA, is the Europe market still better? As far as having an overseas phone in North America, strickly depends on your travel needs. If you stay in N. America, why have one? Dad

Absolutely
Absolutely

I don't mind at all. [i]If you?re in North America on Sprint, Verizon, Bell Mobility or other CDMA providers, how much do you like having a phone you can?t use overseas?[/i]

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