Piracy

Canada turns a blind eye to piracy for personal use

Do you think that piracy is too difficult to track down, and so organizations should stop wasting their time trying to prevent it? Well, that's essentially what's happening in Canada, at least for copyrighted materials that are downloaded for personal use.

Do you think that piracy is too difficult to track down, and so organizations should stop wasting their time trying to prevent it? Well, that's essentially what's happening in Canada, at least for copyrighted materials that are downloaded for personal use.

According to Slashdot:

mlauzon writes: "The RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) announced that it will stop targeting people who download copyrighted material for personal use (Google translation). Their priority will be to focus on organized crime and copyright theft that affects the health and safety of consumers, such as copyright violations related to medicine and electrical appliances, instead of the cash flow of large corporations. Around the same time that the CRIA (Canadian Recording Industry Association) successfully took Demonoid offline, the RCMP made clear that Demonoid's users don't have to worry about getting prosecuted, at least not in Canada. 'Piracy for personal use is no longer targeted,' Noel St-Hilaire, head of copyright theft investigations of the RCMP, said in an interview. 'It is too easy to copy these days and we do not know how to stop it.'"

That last line is the clincher... "It is too easy to copy these days and we do not know how to stop it." Some people may think that Canada's plan is absolutely spot on. After all, why spin your wheels and spend your energy all for naught? Why not focus on an area that is more important -- dealing with health and safety of consumers -- where you can actually make a difference? On the other hand, is this relenting actually sending a loud message that downloading copyrighted materials is okay?

What are your thoughts about piracy for personal use?

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About

Sonja Thompson has worked for TechRepublic since October of 1999. She is currently a Senior Editor and the host of the Smartphones and Tablets blogs.

155 comments
Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

And this response deals with the situation in an intelligent manner. They should target those who make and SELL pirate copies; that is, those who make money out of it. Most people who download a copy of a song, do it, because they can't afford to buy the expensive cd, for just the one or two songs. Thus no loss of revenue to the artists, it's a on sale situation. Target those who sell unlawful copies, and those whose activities risk people's lives. In Australia, our laws allow us to make copies for back ups, and for media change, but not for sale. We must have an original copy we paid the fees on, and make copies only for our own use, destroying them if we dispose of the legal copy. Thus, I can copy my old 45s and 33s onto mp3 or wave, to put on a CD - to enable me to enjoy the legal copy I have. Down here, doing this is lawful, and not copyright piracy, but in some other countries, they call it piracy - when all I'm doing is using my lawfully bought copy, under the terms I bought it under. If you target people who make copies, you can't tell if they are doing so for personal use, as allowed under our laws, or for sale to others. That's why our cops target those selling unlawful copies, and those who make copies in bulk. Glad to see the RMCP acting with some smarts, now if only the USA will.

keull
keull

yippie kayay mofo! we is winning the war on personal liberty when a government says its right to do whats right! of course we should be allowed to let our friends copy our shtuff! in them old days everyone copied films off tv and gave to friends and what not, record music off radio.. why cant you do same with digital? it nonesense that must stop thanks to hippies in power in countries such as canada and hopefully next the whole of western europe will join in! freedom to the humans with internet access!

eddie2go
eddie2go

RCMP puts the responsibility to prosecute on the correct shoulders: the Music Industrie. As pointed out above, copyright infringement is a civil offense and not necessarily a criminal one. Is it then the police's job to find the guilty party? I think not. The Corps must find them thereselves, paying for the search themselves, and paying for the court costs themselves when the get the wrong person, like they seem to do regularly.

ihfwt
ihfwt

ISP's allow P2P file sharing traffic on their networks and God knows what else. If all ISP's in Canada were strictly regulated, you'd have a fighting chance at limiting piracy. But they all have to be on the same page at the same time, else users would jump ship to those allowing P2P traffic.

TheGooch1
TheGooch1

Piracy is when you take something from someone and they no longer have it. Copyright Violation is when you make an copy of something that ( according to the applicable laws ) you do not have the right to make a copy of. Copyright originated in England to control the printing of royal edicts, and was copied ( illegally? :) ) in the US to give artists ( including authors, painters, etc ) some control of their work for a limited time so that they could profit from it, and therefore have an incentive to make something else. However, the digital age has made copyrights obsolete. Where before it was expensive to make copies, and therefore copyright was a valid control, that is no longer the case. Now artists must look for other means to make money, because charging per copy/license is not longer a valid business model. The infrastructure to let the required to keep the old model working is counterproductive, but greedy companies are doing it ( DRM ) anyway. En sum, you don't need a new way to enforce copyright, you need a new way to give an artist the incentive to put together artistic expressions. I say "put together" because "create" does not apply. You do not create music, or poetry, the sound and words already exist, as do all of the possible combinations of the same. You can discover an interesting way of combining them, but there is no one to prevent ( or know ) if someone else has already discovered the same thing, which debunks the existence of "intellectual property"(IP). If you have the intelligence to conceive of something like "IP", you should also be smart enough to understand it doesn't exist.

Meesha
Meesha

Canada, as with several other countries have the right path to this issue. To provide the leg work for organizations such as Microsoft or RIAA and the like for free while they stranglehold the whole industry for greater profits is insane. Personal use is just that, personal. Unlike organized crime it's not sold at any level of profit. Yet anti-piracy organizations believe that they should be accorded special treatment under sovereign countries laws - for free. Policing organizations, i.e. RCMP, MUST prioritize and maximize it's efforts and budgets; so catching the 12 year old next door who has downloaded a few games, mp3s, etc. is rightly NOT a priority when compared to "global mafias" and crime rings that go beyond simple downloading. To help provide legal organizations with their mandates, ask the question, "What is more valuable? The life of an 8 year old boy or girl sold into prostitution/slavery - or the simple act of a child sharing with their mother/father the latest downloaded mp3?" Which would YOU choose go after if you're a "Cop"? Which of these would provide society with a sense of comfort and moral dignity? Which of these is the true measure of the social contract we all live by?

ojeda
ojeda

If CRIA can not get RCMP to prosecute, think they'll hire Blackwater? Lot of folks there gonna be looking for work soon.

ojeda
ojeda

Canada is always so cool - cool people - cool beer - cool weather - that's why i tell people i'm from Canada when i travel overseas - so they don't hate me instantly as they will when i say i'm from US

sarchbold
sarchbold

What some people are not aware of is that in Canada it is legal to download music, we pay a special tax on all recordable devices, ie. Recordable CD???s. This tax is directly handed to the recording industry to offset the loss of the downloading they experience. Everyone pays the tax, even if the CD you buy is not for music. This is why a few years ago when the recording industry tried to force the Canadian ISP???s to hand over names and address for lawsuits the Justice system denied them access.

ojeda
ojeda

Canada is always so cool - cool attitude - cool beer - cool weather - that's why when i visit overseas, i tell people i'm from Canada - then they don't hate me instantly as they would if i said i was from the US

LaPomme
LaPomme

As others here have said, in Canada the term "piracy for personal use" is invalid. Our current Copyright Act supports our Charter of Rights: the "fair dealing" provisions allow an individual to download a file, to copy from one medium to another, etc. for personal use; that is, not for selling or distributing to others. Downloading=legal; uploading material for which you do not own the rights=illegal. A levy on blank media for storing those personal-use copies was instituted when people starting taping music from the radio long before the Internet (a similar small levy is collected on photocopies of books and periodicals) as compensation to irate record companies which were demanding bans on home tape-recorders to protect their business. The same industry players and the software businesses have been lobbying for over a decade to have downloading made a crime and to be given extraordinary powers to pry into individuals' computing habits via their ISPs, by using privacy-invading software, and by appropriating police resources meant to keep the public safe rather than work for particular private interests. None of that has been incorporated into our laws... yet. The American DMCA has no force of law in Canada. ISPs, like all other organizations, are legally bound to keep private information on individuals confidential and secure. The copying levy is applied to blank audio and videotape, CDs and DVDs, and other storage media (various types of diskettes, etc.) so copyright owners do (if registered with a copyright collective and their works copied often enough to issue a cheque) receive a small royalty on sales of their works through digital copying. The system in place may seem odd to others but it works pretty well when used as intended--that is, to allow individuals to make personal use of materials within the law. Calling this "piracy" is a tactic by certain big businesses to pressure our government into adopting American-style laws like the DMCA and American-style predatory tactics like invading citizens' privacy and interfering with their legal behaviours (e.g., computing and Internet use) in order to spy out the few who genuinely *pirate* the intellectual property of others for financial gain. There *is* a legitimate problem with a very small number of Canadians who - illegally tape movie previews and sell pirated copies to compete with the copies sold by those who own the rights - sell counterfeits of popular software packages - deliberately or unintentionally break the law by *uploading* what they do not own, creating a situation whereby the social virtue of "sharing" becomes the social vice of "distributing stolen goods for personal gain" even if the gain in question is an ego-boost rather than a cash payment. Either way, this last practice does cut into the revenues the copyright-owners would otherwise expect ... but by no means as much as certain lobbies would have us believe. Most people who download entertainment from dubious sources wouldn't pay for the stuff anyway. Most of the revenue lost by the entertainment business is from the sale of counterfeit physical copies, mostly to people who think they are getting the real thing. What's more, the industry knows this: they successfully lobbied to have it made illegal to record a movie being shown in a theatre, which means some patrons are now having their bags searched, cellphones confiscated, etc. by theatre staff in an attempt to stop piracy at the source. They know that, given the Canadian Charter of Rights, no matter how pro-business a government might be, it's unlikely to succeed with legislation that violates our rights and freedoms to satisfy the demands of particular private interests. But they also know Canadians are subject to constant bombardment with American entertainment products --television programs and films in particular but also magazines and news stories run unannotated in Canadian papers-- which can be used to suggest U.S. laws and practices are applicable here. Most Canadians *think* we "mirandize" arrestees, are a handy haven for terrorists aiming southwards, etc. It wasn't so hard to have them effectively brainwashed into thinking we are "pirates" for making perfectly legal copies of perfectly legal downloads. Once enough politicians and Chambers of Commerce believe that, there's a far better chance of "harmonizing" Canadian law to what's being done in the U.S. and, in fact, that's exactly what's being lobbied for by certain parties. However, there are many other interested parties --librarians, educators, independent performers, Internet law professors, and other "ordinary citizens"--for whom the industry lobbies do not speak. As long as we can still speak for ourselves, a revised Copyright Act is not likely to be passed, there being little agreement on what it should contain. Sadly, that means we still don't have a Canadian legal definition of "piracy" -- unless you go back to the British law in effect back when the country was first settled. That one was about hijacking and stealing cargo from ships --a serious crime which still goes on in the modern world but somehow gets a lot less attention than teenagers listening to music.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

There lots of valid uses for P2P. Sharing of self created documents. Sharing of publicly funded or educational documents. Artists choosing to have there art released freely by P2P. Don't kill a technology just because one of it's uses is disagreable. That's killing off the symptom not the cause. This is like telling an American that all guns should be outright banned because some of those firearms are used badly. No firearms of any kind carried or owned be it by a FAC licensed owner, historian, collector or any other non military, non police agency. Granted, there have been a lot of abuses of the right to bare arms (or arm bears.. whichever, it's a free country). (I think firearms should not be carried outside of from home to range and back and that all gun owners should be licensed and registered but that's just me and there's a whole nation to the south of me that feels differently. This isn't a debate about gun law, it was just an example.)

Meesha
Meesha

I strongly disagree with your statement. ISPs are just a delivery modal NOT society's guard dogs. The internet to date has proven to be a hugely effective democratic and vociferous tool for all nations of the world. The internet should be equated to the Canadian Bill of Rights or to the US Constitution where all people have access that is not restricted simply because a special interest group, i.e. RIAA simply doesn't like the fact that they're not making as much money as they used to. Forcing the current internet down such as path as you have suggested is tantamount to a solid totalitarian dictatorship which we have far to many in the world now. I don't want to live in that kind of society and I'm betting you don't either. "Freedoms are hard won but easily taken away from the lazy man."

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

make it non profitable to make and sell items with a copyright violation. If people can buy the original at a reasonable price, then they will - but deliberately over pricing, like RIAA does, makes it are profitable exercise to make unlawful copies. Like prohibition in the USA in the 1920s, by making it unlawful, it became profitable to smuggle small quantities of alcohol into the states. Of every $30 paid out for a CD, the artist would be lucky to get $1 of that, the rest goes into the pockets of the recording company executives, with a little to the retail vendors. So cut the profits to the recording company, and you get lower prices, eventually, the cost of making copies becomes unprofitable.

Jaqui
Jaqui

to download music or videos. the wording of the law requires that the Canadian Government be paid a copyright usage fee for each item. They then put a tax on blank cd and dvd disks that pays the Government usage fee on the copywritten material. So in Canada we paid the copyright license fees required under law, by purchasing a blank cd to burn it to. :D edit to add: back in the 1980s I used to send the Government money for the "pirated" satellight TV signals" we put into bars, 5 cents for each seat, per channel, once a month. This was for the US channels that would not sell subscriptions to Canadians, like HBO and SHOWTIME. This was the course of action that the Canadian Government recommended to us to make us legal IN CANADA.

Timbo Zimbabwe
Timbo Zimbabwe

"You do not create music, or poetry, the sound and words already exist, as do all of the possible combinations of the same." cre?ate /kriˈeɪt/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[kree-eyt] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation verb, -at?ed, -at?ing, adjective ?verb (used with object) 1. to cause to come into being, as something unique that would not naturally evolve or that is not made by ordinary processes. 2. to evolve from one's own thought or imagination, as a work of art or an invention. 3. Theater. to perform (a role) for the first time or in the first production of a play. 4. to make by investing with new rank or by designating; constitute; appoint: to create a peer. 5. to be the cause or occasion of; give rise to: The announcement created confusion. 6. to cause to happen; bring about; arrange, as by intention or design: to create a revolution; to create an opportunity to ask for a raise. ?verb (used without object) 7. to do something creative or constructive. 8. British. to make a fuss. ?adjective 9. Archaic. created. [Origin: 1350?1400; ME creat (ptp.) < L creātus, equiv. to creā- (s. of creāre to make) + -tus ptp. suffix] It doesn't matter if the words, notes, etc, already exist. When you "put together" words or music, you are CREATING the arrangement of those words or music into an expression. So yes, you DO need to enforce copyright. However, you should pick and choose your battles wisely.

Naegling
Naegling

...because I specifically was curious about the legal aspects of file sharing/music sharing, and so I asked a lawyer friend about it. He said that the law is very ambiguous about it, at least in the U.S. But as best as he can tell, it's still legal to download music as long as you don't possibly make money from it. He also said that the high-profile arrests were mainly centered on folks that downloaded some 3,000 songs, thus making it very likely in the government's eyes that they would try to resell some.

shryko
shryko

so, it'd go through the RCMP to gather the proof, or else the evidence would be thrown out of court because it illegally violates the consumer's privacy rights. in the end? good luck getting that to happen.

shryko
shryko

just be sure not to tarnish the image us canadians have in the minds of foreigners. We're sort of a proud people. really, if you enjoy canada so much, just come on up and join us.

Sonja Thompson
Sonja Thompson

Do you think this system is effective? Should other countries pass similar legislation?

jma64658
jma64658

When a musical group wants to make a CD, the recording industry offers a contract that includes the performer pays all recording costs and advertizing. The company only pays for actual pressing and distribution. Also, the group may make 30 - 40 tracks with only a few good ones. The company makes several CDs spreading the good tracks over the CDs and filling them up with poor tracks. Hence people want to NOT pay $15 - 18 for one or two good tracks, so they download what they want. Look at the success of iTunes. People will pay a reasonable charge for a tune they want. The recording industry in the US has encouraged downloading without paying by their greedy policies.

PogiDaga
PogiDaga

It would be a waste of taxpayer dollars for the government to go after "personal use" pirates. It sounds to me like the government has some of its priorities in order.

Jrats_Revenge
Jrats_Revenge

That's pretty sad... You should be PROUD of where you come from even if you don't agree with how things are run. If you don't like it, you have the ability to effect changes by voting and making your voice heard. That's why it's call a Democracy.

ruscarediwillbeatu
ruscarediwillbeatu

I think Canada has a very lax attitude about many things. They're loved for their easy-going ways, but they are not the ones that have their bottom lines affected by this. While I don't condone theft, and that's what it is...the fact remains that the movie industry continues to churn out garbage that costs more and more to make, and doesn't have one tenth of the integrity of the movies 20 years ago, so I do see the pirates' point of view...why pay for garbage? Bring back movies that have a morale to the story!! I'll pay to see that...as of now I wait for them to release on DVD or even go to TV.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

down here in Australia, that's why our laws allow cross media copying of legal copyright versions for personal use. I have a VHS copy of a film I bought years ago, I want to cross media it to a DVD for me to watch on my modern TV, that's legal, as long as I have a legal copyright paid copy in my house and I don't try to give people copies or sell copies. Piracy is the act of using force to remove something from a boat, usually in International waters. No force involved in copying.

simon.adams
simon.adams

After all is said and done here, the main people that are really losing from the illegal downloading of music is the new talent that isnt being nurtured by the big record companies. And the general public are losing out hearing some of the great new music that is being created by the individuals and small guys. It is so easy now to set yourself up awith an online store to sell your music digitally through itunes and many others that you dont need a record company to be the middleman. But making enough sales to support yourself through this endeavour is becoming harder when your creations are immediately ripped and posted on every illegal MP3 site there is. For my musical endeavour www.kandystand.com , all I can do is try to offer a great product that people will (and indeed do) buy because of the quality of the product.

Ian Thurston
Ian Thurston

I mean Canadians: The Canadian government is now proposing "reverse onus" legislation for certain classes of crimes. In other words, "guilty until proven innocent." Of course, that's what's happened de facto both in Canada and the U.S. whenever the magic words "suspected terrorist" are invoked - into the slammer or maybe even off to a country that can torture you until you prove your innocence. How did we ever let our governments get away with this? As for file sharing, setting computers up so they get dumb if it's even remotely possible they might be used for copying reeks of the same "reverse onus" crap ... how'd we ever let Microsoft get away with it???

Eoghan
Eoghan

That would be the socialist way of doing things, wouldn't it? I've got a better idea for you, why don't you work full time and just let the government keep ALL your money. Oh, that's right, that's communism. But just how many steps from socialism is it to communism?

TheGooch1
TheGooch1

The same combinations can be created by different people at the same time, without either knowing what the other did. This actually happened to me in elementary school. We had a homework assignment to write a poem, and myself and another student wrote the exact same poem. We were not in contact at all from the time the assignment was given to the time that we got in front of the class to read out poems. So...who owned the copyright to the poem? Its been estimated that by 2040, due to population growth, there will be enough people "creating" (your definition) music such that multiple people will be creating the same songs every minute. This is because there are only so many combinations of notes, and once there are enough people doing it, duplication becomes unavoidable. So then, who sues who? In the end, the current copyright model must be thrown out, as it is not sustainable, and it already has ceased to satisfy the need for which it was created.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Actually in terms of copyright the RIAA, (out of the goodness of their own hearts) are fronting for the artists, they have the copyright. The distribution rights, which of course have no bearing on this issue whatsoever are the concern of the media giants, and 3000 tunes does concern them there. Fair use and piracy both use the same tools, the intent is different though. I'm sure little Sarah wasn't charging her mates to download off Kazaa.

computerd}}
computerd}}

Downloading for personal use isn't illegal. This has been going on since they came out with computers and they won't stop it. There will always be a way to share it. I pulled out a Magazine that acually said where you could find mp3s and download them for free (Maximum PC 02/2000). Years later it got out of hand and the only way to try to stop everyone from doing it is to make them pay a heafty fine. Then by doing that, they should go after Microsoft and fine them for making the software which started it all. If they keep shutting down all these torrent sites, where am I suppose to get all my patches when I can't find them anywhere else? From www.demonoid.com website: The CRIA threatened the company renting the servers to us, and because of this it is not possible to keep the site online. Sorry for the inconvenience and thanks for your understanding. Plus, with that site constantly watching for fake files it was one of the best sites to get patches from. But I guess it's ok for the MediaDefenders to make a site and put useless stuff out there. Isn't that illegal? http://blog.wired.com/monkeybites/2007/09/stolen-mediadef.html

Tig2
Tig2

As other posters have pointed out, it is not illegal to download music in Canada due to a copy tax attached to writable media. But even if that were not the case, I think that the direction from a law enforcement perspective alone is the right path. It frees up the law enforcement professional to focus on things that have a greater value- mass distributors of pirated content, for instance. I don't condone theft in any manner but also understand that it is up to me to teach that value to my household. I have to not rely on the actions that government take on a wide scale to reinforce morals and values. The drivers for a governmental decision will rarely apply in my own house. I don't have to worry about mass distribution in my home. I have to worry about the member of my family that might think that piracy or copyright infringement is okay. There is a woman in my state who was dragged through court for downloading over 3,000 songs through a sharing site. Who won the battle? Music sharing has increased, not decreased. People have just re-discovered the "sneaker net". I have to ask the question, "What was gained? Who paid for it? Who profited from it?" The radio station (Christian format) reminds listeners that it is morally wrong to download music from sharing sites. From what I hear, that reminder does more good than all the lawsuits you can press.

Oktet
Oktet

"Canadian authorities seem to recognize that the REAL problem is piracy for profit, which accounts for more financial losses than individuals downloading for personal use."

Timbo Zimbabwe
Timbo Zimbabwe

"The company only pays for actual pressing and distribution." Actually, the artist is responsible for ALL costs of production, promotion, etc. The artist loses everything, the label loses nothing. But that isn't the point here, is it? The point is that there is only so much law enforcement or legislation can do to alleviate the problem. Bringing lawsuits against little kids or arresting them is the goal of the irrational RIAA, not Canada. Canadian authorities seem to recognize that the REAL problem is piracy for profit, which accounts for more financial losses than individuals downloading for personal use.

TwoChutes
TwoChutes

You know it's wrong because the law says it is, but it's an arbitrary law that can be changed by a random decision of the law makers so by breaking it you are trying to encourage them to change it. Basically if enough people breaka law it's probably a bad law to start with and needs to be reviewed. I think the RCMP's action is another indication to the Canadian law makers to review the copyright/fair use laws. As for speeding, it raises to much revenu for the "government" to want to change it, they want you to speed :-) Mr Cynic

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

ROFLMAO Now that was funny, missing out the silly emoticon was a stroke of genius.

homer4598
homer4598

one has very little chance to effect change through voting. The U.S. is a republic - a representative democracy, where sovereignty is exercised by a subset of the people, elected periodically, but otherwise free to advance their own agendas (thanks Wikipedia). In other words, I elect people who "say" that they are going to do X, but they really do Y because of special interest groups.

Timbo Zimbabwe
Timbo Zimbabwe

"While I don't condone theft, and that's what it is" OK, now YOU foot the bill to go after little 12 y.o. Sally Jenkins down the street or 13 y.o. Bobby Landry on the other side of town... it is expensive to go after the "little guy" just as it is to go after the big fish. As far as I'm concerned, Canada is taking the right approach to go after those making a profit from piracy, regardless of your view on stealing. You can go after a kid shoplifting a pack of smokes or you can go after the organized crime family smuggling thousands of cartons of cigarettes across the border. Your choice, but don't expect me to help pay for the prosecution of the shoplifting kid.

simon.adams
simon.adams

I mentioned this in an earlier post of mine, but agreed, if we had more high quality in films, music and software, and better customer service and after sales care people would pay for this. Its no longer about paying for the product, its the proposition (well it always has been, but now you have to work harder to please the customer - so I suppose thats a good thing for the consumer)

artistseries
artistseries

The article stated ?Le piratage [de musique par l'entremise d'Internet ou d'autres m?dias] pour usage personnel n'est plus cibl?? In Canada, music sharing for personal use is legal.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

anything, if they find any new talent, they set out to rip it off. I saw a web site post on this about 3 years ago, by a performer who had 4 gold and 2 platinum records. They got less than 1% of the money the record company got, and after the taxes, it wasn't that much. When they got the first big hit, the record company sent them on a big promotion tour, 5 star hotels around the world, a dozen people to handle PR etc. the record company book and organised it all. It cost a fortune, and the record company took the entire cost out of their royalties, and told them to list it all as a business expense - they lot should have come out of the record's gross profits, not the royalties - but the 'standard' contract for the company has that stuff as a performer expense - but the performer doesn't get a say in organising it. The company got very upset when they refused to sign a new contract - suddenly their records were much harder to buy, the company stopped pressing them or letting people know theyw ere available, they denied people the right to use the songs and pay royalties. essentially, the record company went out of its way to strangle any income opportunities for the performer, as a way to force them to sign with them again. It's because of this that so many performers end up dropping recording and do live concerts and the club circuit so often. It's why so many go about releasing their own labels when they can get the funds to do it - they get fed up of being ripped off. Many new and up coming groups and performers are making money by selling their songs for Internet download at US$1 each. Cheap enough that people would rather pay for a legal copy. You don't hear them on the radio much as the record companies aren't promoting them to the radio stations. it's not easy for them, but it's a damn sight better than dealing with one of the big record companies.

JamesRL
JamesRL

http://www.canada.com/windsorstar/story.html?id=eb24c2f6-7372-4da6-abdc-806fad175d18 So a few crooks in the US are charging the Mexicans 400$ to print a form from the internet (that they could get for free) and fill in some blanks. They have been 300 come in oevr a three week period - how many cross the US Mexican border every day? Currently only 14.7 % of Mexican refugee claims are approved, but the process may tale over a year and they get social assistance till then. Yes its not a great situation. It still pales in comparison with the total number of people collecting welfare in say, Detroit. James

computerd}}
computerd}}

going to send all of our illegal mexicans to your country and see how much money you can save when they start using all of your resources. We will start with Michigan, there are 400,000 illegals that reside here and what better place to move them than up north.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I thought off topic was de rigeur around here..... James

Jaqui
Jaqui

my only tax comment was the sales tax on blank media, so his entire comment was completely off topic. ;) [ despite what others have said, last time I was near a London Drugs computer shop I saw the sign advertising the tax on blank disks, which was only a month ago. ]

JamesRL
JamesRL

....instead of per capita, the US is a much bigger welfare state than Canada. And as an economist friend of mine found out, sometimes state tax variations means some Americans pay higher overall tax rates than Canadians. But never mind, you just go on believing. Does it piss you off that our taxes are getting lower? We have been getting small income tax reductions since the late 90s, and the GST has gone from 7% to 5%. Our national government is in surplus and has been since 1997. We are paying down the national debt. Our surplus is growing. The economy of Newfoundland, our poorest province, is improving due to oil revenues. When was the last time the US government posted a surplus? (I know, do you?). When was the last time that the US lowered income taxes? As for we evil commies up north, the feds sold Air Canada and Petro Canada. The CBC is still government funded, but unlike PBS does sell ads and costs alot less to run. It also has commerical competition. In many economic ways Canada and Canadians are more conservative than Americans. We are less likely to take risks on the stock market and we don't have the easy credit that has been killing the US economy lately. We save more and spend less. But hey if you feel the need to put down others just to feel good yourself, at least know what the heck you are talking about. James

tomhirtler
tomhirtler

Since the current copyright laws fail to do what they were intended to do it's time to replace them with something that will. The problem is that would cause some of the entrenched power to be lost by people who don't take kindly to lossing power.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

It's chock full of spyware and adware. It makes you a distribution node and dumps marker file on you hard drive, with interesting names like Man does babysitter, and father f**ks daughter... There is a version where a lot of this taken out, but I wouldn't trust it as far as I can spit my baseunit. There are some very good open source p2p2 clients (emule for isntance) which are 'safe'. Get it from the real source and the only physical danger is you pick up an infected file that your virus checker doesn't pick up. The problem with the P2P network (not teh tech but the users) though is some really sick b'stards use it to distribute highly illegal content such as paedo movies and some times with disguised names, so you can end up with something that will get you prosecuted on your hard drive. The idea of kids having access to this stuff scares the heck out of me, it makes the internet look like a christian fundamentalist bookstore.

Oktet
Oktet

Is P2P sharing even, considered safe? Limewire, Kazaa sounds like a good invitation to free music and videos; in addition, to an awesome virus/trojan horse not to mention the malware, that is the last thing I need on my PC(s) and list of to do's (removing Viruses and Malware). It is so easy to package an legitimate looking file with a backdoor trojan and insert a viruses, why risk that for a measly free mp3? I personally don't like having my ports open or left open because I am using some P2P sharing; therefore, I opt to pay for my music-it's only 0.99c per song, maybe cheaper depending on which site you visit. I hope little Sarah has her computer backed- up on an external hard drive (media) and on some ftp server-messing around with P2P.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Saved my friends butt in that case and I had to laugh when I first heard his story years ago.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

people think they represent you. :D I mean we (bloody UK as well) went over there, freed them from that awful tyrant we used to sponsor, killed loads of their friends and relatives, blew their houses up, left them with out any services, knocked their country into the dark ages, invited a bunch of terrorists to the party. And the f**kers show no gratitude whatsoever, it's really hard to get your head round, I mean they are much better off aren't they?

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

He was on a park bench enjoying the night air when someone came out of no where and sat down on the other end of the bench. They got chatting and then she suddenly exclaimed "oh, your from Canada". She then turned around and shouted "Hey, he's from Canada" and a number of large burly blokes stepped out from behind trees. They spend the rest of the evening chatting and hanging out though I somehow thing it would have ended different had he not been Canadian in that case. Patriotism is great and all but sometimes it's just better go with what gets you by when out of State.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

People should not vear there Government. Governments should fear there people. Best of luck in the next ellection.

jdclyde
jdclyde

with all the teams of lawyers that the Democrats have crawling over everything LOOKING for something to blame losing the election over, and finding nothing, people like you still can't believe Kerry/Gore lost because they lost. The problem is instead of moving away from the other group out of hate and differences, how about moving together out of things we have in common?

Jrats_Revenge
Jrats_Revenge

I was actually more taken aback about the whole "I tell people I'm from Canada because they won't hate me cause I am really come from the US" Comment. For God's sake, be proud of where you come from! I don't give a flying you know what of what other people think of me because I come from the US. If you can't be proud to be an American, then maybe you should move to... Canada!

PogiDaga
PogiDaga

The last two U.S. elections were likely rigged. I don't think "democracy" in the U.S. is very representative anymore. I know for a fact the current government doesn't represent my interests at all. I'm more afraid of my own government that the bogeymen the government tries to scare me with.

TheGooch1
TheGooch1

I mean, when you vote in the presidential election, the electoral votes have priority over the popular vote. So now, who really gets to vote for the president?

simon.adams
simon.adams

Yes that is a fair explanation of personal fair use, if you buy an MP3 off the web, and save it on your PC, you should be then able to download it again without paying for it if you paid for it in the first place.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

I have a brand new CD I paid a heap for, CDs are easily scratched, and I want to play this in the car a lot. So I make a copy, leave the original in the cover, put away in my cupboard at home, and put the copy in the car CD, so it doesn't matter if it gets scratched or trashed in an accident. The copy is for my 'personal use' - lucky for us Aussies, our laws already say we can do this - we can even change it across media for personal use - so I can make a CD from my old 45s, or a Mpeg from a CD, to play in my MP3 player.

tomhirtler
tomhirtler

Why would anyone increase the recorded sales of some "artist" just to use the thing for target practice when you can open your bottom drawer and take past version of XYZ for free? What distance are you shooting from that you need that big of a target?

simon.adams
simon.adams

'property that an individual owns for personal enjoyment' my point exactly, if you own it for personal enjoyment, and you share it with someone it is no longer ' personal enjoymnet ' so there is no law in Canada that allows file sharing as people keep saying...

Oktet
Oktet

Personal Use Property (Media, Software), A type of property that an individual does not use for business purposes or hold as an investment. In other words, property that an individual owns for personal enjoyment.

mhbowman
mhbowman

understood why anyone would purchase a Celine Dion CD for any use. Target practice?

simon.adams
simon.adams

I have seen this one before, what is the actual legal definition of 'personal use' in Canada? surely personal means yourself, why would you share music with yourself. what would fall out of scope for personal use? business use? when did you last see a company buy a Celine Dion CD for business use. Oh this thread will run and run :)

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