CXO

China blocks YouTube in bid to censor Tibet crackdown

Internet users in China have reported that they have been unable to access YouTube.com starting from Sunday. This happened after dozens of amateur videos chronicling the violence in the Tibetan capital, Lhasa, were apparently posted on the popular video-sharing site.

Internet users in China have reported that they have been unable to access YouTube.com starting from Sunday. This happened after dozens of amateur videos chronicling the violence in the Tibetan capital, Lhasa, were apparently posted on the popular video-sharing site.

Excerpt from Wired blogs:

The blocking added to the communist government's efforts to control what the public saw and heard about protests that erupted Friday in the Tibetan capital, Lhasa, against Chinese rule. Access to YouTube.com, usually readily available in China, was blocked after videos appeared on the site Saturday, showing foreign news reports about the Lhasa demonstrations, montages of photos, and scenes from Tibet-related protests abroad.

Rick Martin, who reports from China over at CNET, supplied the following screen shot as proof of the block.

youtubechinajpg.png

This would hardly be the first time that YouTube has suffered a blockage. Just last month, the Pakistan government ordered access to the site cut off after apparently being displeased by a video running on the site. It inadvertently resulted in a global YouTube outage.

Now, access to YouTube could hardly be considered mission-critical. However, in the brave new world of SaaS, having entire domains cut off could have disastrous consequences. Do you see such domain-level interference increasing or decreasing in the future?

About Paul Mah

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

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