Broadband

Code of practice demanded for broadband connection speeds in the United Kingdom

The Consumer Panel, established by the U.K. communications regulator OfCom, has called for a mandatory code of practice from ISPs to provide consumers with clear information on the realistic speeds to expect from their Internet connections and an option to shift to other packages if expectations are not met.

The Consumer Panel, established by the U.K. communications regulator OfCom, has called for a mandatory code of practice from ISPs to provide consumers with clear information on the realistic speeds to expect from their Internet connections and an option to shift to other packages if expectations are not met.

An excerpt from The Press Association:

Customers should have the right to switch to a different deal or opt out of their contracts penalty-free if their actual broadband speed is significantly lower than that advertised, the Consumer Panel said.

Internet service providers should provide clear, upfront information to householders about factors which can affect line speed.

And they should contact customers a fortnight after installation to tell them their actual broadband speed, the Panel said.

ISPs are known to market network connections, promising the sky with high theoretical connection speeds, only to have users foxed into accepting contracts with a fraction of promised throughput. The recommendations from the Consumer Panel will ensure that users get more choices in accepting the terms of the contracts.

Do you believe the recent steps will go a long way in addressing user concerns over Internet speed?

More information:

Ofcom Demands Crackdown On Broadband Speed Claims (TrustedReview)

Broadband speeds: the issue that everyone's trying to get sorted out (Guardian)

Ofcom advised to issue 'code of practice' for ISP speeds (BCS)

3 comments
Absolutely
Absolutely

[i]Customers should have the right to switch to a different deal or opt out of their contracts penalty-free [b]if[/b] their actual broadband speed is [b]significantly[/b] lower than that advertised, the Consumer Panel said.[/i] Bloody right, we should! [b]If[/b] the determination of how much breach of contract defines "[b]significantly[/b] lower," ie sufficient cause to take our business elsewhere, is left [b]entirely[/b] to customers, this maybe of some value to Britons. [b]If[/b] not, it is probably nothing better than an insincere attempt to be [b]perceived[/b] as respecting customers' rights [to receive what was promised in exchange for the price paid] without expending the effort required to actually do so.

GreyTech
GreyTech

and describing it correctly is what is required. So up to 8Mbps is not good enough. BT supplies the ISP with the likely range of speeds for the particular phone line. My line is indicated as 4.4Mbps max and I regularly get 5.7Mbps. The other "feature" not explained is contention ratio and can make a huge difference at peak times. Getting ISPs to describe the product fairly is all that is required.

pr.arun
pr.arun

Do you believe the recent steps will go a long way in addressing user concerns over internet speed?

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