Hardware

Computer monitor that draws zero power on standby

Fujitsu Siemens has successfully come up with monitors that don't consume electricity from the main electrical supply when in standby mode.

Fujitsu Siemens has successfully come up with monitors that don't consume electricity from the main electrical supply when in standby mode. The technology is covered by six patents, and the first of these monitors are scheduled to go on sale next spring.

How do these monitors work? They use capacitors to store enough of a charge to flick it back on when the signal returns. The presence of solar panels also provide enough power to maintain this mode for up to five days. Beyond that, a regular power button can be used to bring the monitor out of standby.

Excerpt from Personal Computer World:

Fujitsu Siemens showed two 22in widescreen test monitors with power meters attached at a press event in Augsburg, Germany. The display drew 0.6-0.9W when the monitor was switched off using its standby button and with an active video signal from a VGA cable present. When the display signal was switched off, the monitor drew zero power even though the standby/power button was not pressed.

This technology appears to come in handy when you consider estimates by the British Government that up to eight percent of all domestic electricity is consumed by devices in standby.

Would power efficiency in a computer monitor influence your buying decision?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

10 comments
techrepublic
techrepublic

I had done this in 1992, and had got the circuit published as two different circuits in 1992 and 1998. How can I raise claims on the patent. Can somebody help ? I was preparing to file a patent with 4 claims where different applications of the same circuit would be applied.

paulmah
paulmah

Would power efficiency in a computer monitor influence your buying decision?

gkrew
gkrew

yes. Power efficient monitors would influence me to buy it over non-efficient ones. I am all for monitors that run using less power.

gaucho_mail
gaucho_mail

Small UPS normally could exceed the max. current it supports when you power-up a monitor.

kevin.carbonaro
kevin.carbonaro

If all of us consider buying a power efficient monitor, then add up the tiny watts together, all of us would benefit... Less pollution in the air! So I would consider buying it, at least I do my part in saving the world ;)

zetacon4
zetacon4

Energy Conservation should be top priority for all consumers. I'm keeping an eye out for any product that helps save energy and money.

bradgalliford
bradgalliford

I turn my monitor off every time I am not using it.. With today's flat screens it takes just as long to turn on as it does to come out of stand by. God forbid you have to reach up and hit a power button... I do think that the technology is pretty neat though! I would like to see it implemented in cell phones. Think about it. You would be able to get so many more hours off a charge if it only turned on when you got a phone call!

derf24
derf24

Surely we need consistent definitions, such as the following. For each PC and all of its own dedicated dependent items: OFF - pressing one button to get it powered on again. Zero power used when off. STANDBY - a compromise between using the least amount of power while becoming fully active in the shortest possible time by pressing one button. HIBERNATION - software control aimed at accurately storing the active system state while using only milliwatts of power; then restoring the active state in seconds by keyboard, mouse, online command, or schedule control. I want to see a monitor that is capable of operating under all of these system conditions. I'm not happy with the overall power saving scene at present. Will the necessary changes be called algoreithms? (Couldn't resist that!)

rkuhn040172
rkuhn040172

Because I can't get my users to turn things off for the life of me. If I could use a power saving mode like this and force the setting onto them then we could get somewhere. I'll give you just one example of how bad it gets here. At least once a month I get a user complaining that their printer is slow. I walk over to their desk, power it off and then back on and lo and behold it is fast again. Yes, even printers need to be power cycled occasionally.

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

That automatic is not the best way? I think that millions of people would, in fact, prefer the automation of this rather than 'reach out' (seems so very primitive) and press a button. I mean really, do you expect them to 'do things' on their own as well?? :^0 :^0 :^0

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