Data Centers

Data center tech getting hot attention

Microsoft is planning to build container-based portable data centers, and Sun Microsystems is zeroing in on its data center footprint.

Microsoft is planning to build container-based portable data centers, and Sun Microsystems is zeroing in on its data center footprint.

These two technology announcements have big implications in the data center space.

An excerpt from DataCenterKnowledge:

Microsoft is actively developing container-based data centers and hopes to deploy some of them in the company's massive new data center in the Chicago area. Debra Chrapaty, Microsoft's Corporate Vice President of Global Foundation Services, said the company is examining containerized data centers that can manage power loads exceeding 1,000 watts per square foot.

The data center space had been set abuzz some time back with Sun Microsystems Project Blackbox and Rackable Systems ICE Cube.

In a separate announcement on his inaugural blog, Sun Microsystems Data Center architect, Brian Cinque, announced that his firm would look to eliminate its data center footprint by 2015.

An excerpt from Infoworld:

The great migration to nothing will be evolutionary, Cinque writes, noting that Sun's IT infrastructure will reach a point at which it will no longer be able to reap greater efficiencies by way of server virtualization, storage consolidation, and the like. At that time, Sun's IT operations will transform "from a service oriented architecture to a more of a software as a service."

While the shift to utility computing seems the happening thing, let's not forget the likes of Google and Amazon. The search giant had filed a patent for portable data center technologies, and the e-commerce giant already has an array of services for storage and computing up and running.

The shift to utility computing is gathering pace.

IBM, HP, Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and Intel too -- can this domain get more attention?