Hardware

Data loss bug discovered in Leopard

A blogger has discovered a data loss glitch in Apple's recently released Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard. This bug could result in the loss of data when moving files from a Mac to or from any external drives. The medium could range from a local USB flash drive, SMB file share, or even a network attached storage.

A blogger has discovered a data loss glitch in Apple's recently released Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard. This bug could result in the loss of data when moving files from a Mac to or from any external drives. The medium could range from a local USB flash drive, SMB file share, or even a network attached storage.

Excerpt from The Register:

According to Tom Karpik, the bug manifests itself when an attempt to move - rather than copy - a folder from the Mac is interrupted. Moving a folder off a disk essentially involves first copying it then deleting the original. Karpik shows that Finder fails to ensure that the folder has been successfully written to the target disk before removing the original.

You can read the original article from Tom here: Massive data loss bug in Leopard.

Like Windows, Mac OS X defaults to copying if source and destination are not from the same drive. In fact, to perform a "move" on the Mac, the user will specifically need to hold down the Command key. Bearing this in mind, most users will probably do a copy followed by a manual delete of the source files.

Still, nothing like having the bug hit when performing some heavy-duty migration to spoil your entire week. To spice it up some, this bug apparently goes all the way back to Panther.

So Mac-fans, just stick to the "copy then delete" routine for now, eh?

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About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

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