Networking

Imports of 3G and advanced wireless shut down


Shortly after patent squabbles between Nokia and Qualcomm closed U.S. borders to CDMA phone imports from the Finnish mobile giant, more patent squabbles are banning even more wireless gear from Buffalo. This time, the patents are held by an Australian agency unlike the Qualcomm-Broadcom squabble still hanging despite Broadcom's offer to the CDMA developer Qualcomm.

Commercial IT managers are now developing their budget plans for the new fiscal year, and government IT departments are not far behind and, with the squabbles on 3G and wireless, planning to spend on those technologies could be disappointing. The net result seems to be even more delay in rolling out next-generation cellular wireless, as a result of fewer handsets and transceivers to put in the hands of users.

Is your department planning for tighter supplies for CDMA, EV-DO, and W-CDMA cellular data? Will this result in user dismay, as they find they can't get newer and faster mobile gear? Join the discussion.

3 comments
K7AAY
K7AAY

Is your IT department expecting tighter availability and higher prices for what does get through, as a result of the patent squabbles, surrounding W-CDMA?

ebanksto
ebanksto

Hi John, It is interesting and perhaps frustrating to see what is happening with the patent infringement suits. Every time a law suit is filed, it becomes yet another bullet on the risk management sheet. - Do we plan on implementing on current technology, or wait to see what is going to shake out of this squabble? - Do we use it at all? - Do we have a choice? Stockholders are wanting return on investment, publicly traded companies have highly compensated leaders who have a responsibility to the stockholders to provide the best ROI. Unfortunately, getting the ROI up in the short term may actually reduce the ROI in the long term, but since most of these highly compensated executives are usually short term (less than 5 years) they don't plan that far. This leaves the rest of the team in a fickle. How do we progress and provide security and still get a respectable ROI on the implementation. A different approach is that perhaps the law suit is actually slight of hand so that we have a brand new technology rolling out that we will again have to assess. In all cases, you have to plan on the knowns, understanding that the unknowns can create analysis paralysis. Ahhh, technology. Forever a quagmire of contradicting technology.

jhuybers
jhuybers

Australia supports your war of terror.

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