After Hours

Last minute reprieve for Internet radio


The Congress on Thursday heard of an unexpected last minute reprieve for Internet radio, so that the drain on corporate bandwidth will continue (if not firewalled out).

Internet radio now pays only songwriting royalties. Sound Exchange convinced the U. S. Copyright Office to cede to it the collection of performance royalties, to make the tax retroactive, and scaling up charges based on the number of listeners. For many months, the fans of Internet radio (e.g., SaveNetRadio.org) made their case on the Web that such charges were onerous and destructive, and they lobbied the Congress for some form of relief from fees said to spell the death of online radio.

At a House hearing about the new destructive rates for online radio, SoundExchange made a dramatic pronouncement. Instead of discussing its plans to collect the new royalty payments next week, its executive director promised before the Representatives that SoundExchange won't enforce the new royalty rates. Webcasters may online as new rates are hammered out.

A royalty opponent told a Wired writer that everyone who called their Congress person about this should feel that they had an effect on the process: "This is a direct result of lobbying pressure, so if anyone thinks their call didn't matter, it did. That's why this is happening."

Will continued net radio be a problem for the systems you administer, or is this a blessing instead of a continued problem?

4 comments
bhathaway
bhathaway

Does this mean that stations like Radio Paradise can continue to provide artists and listeners with the best of what is currently out there. Those who are looking for a step up from satellite radio need to consider internet radio and those who listen to FM and a tired of hearing the same Def Leopard song played over and over as if it was the only won they recorded will find internet radio the new landscape for getting unbiased programming to the masses. How long will the repreive last?

K7AAY
K7AAY

Or, is this a blessing for you?

zetacon4
zetacon4

I am surprised that your only concern on this issue is how it will affect your internal network functioning. Millions of people enjoy quality programming every day at home or in private small business settings. Whether you are equipped to handle net radio streaming in your business network is a matter for your administrator to decide. I know of many businesses that openly encourage their workers to use the net for any use that does not endanger or abuse the network. I currently use cable broadband in my home office and I can stream several media streams at once with no loss of bandwidth for browsing or other net activities. We have several computers live on our network at all times here. And, lastly, we each should always work to continue our personal freedoms wherever we can. Corporate greed is on the increase, and those in control of financial policies will always favor increasing profits over any other consideration.

meryllogue
meryllogue

Personally, I do not use my work PC for listening to Net Radio. It is against our usage policy. So if you are having problems internally, perhaps you should filter it, or create usage policies and monitor for adherance. It should be very easy to block at a firewall, right? And just as easy to monitor?

Editor's Picks