Networking

Legit Web video distributor asks FCC to stop ISP traffic throttling

A Web-based distributor of online video content has filed a complaint with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, asking for traffic throttling be prohibited by ISPs. The petition was filed by Vuze, which uses the BitTorrent protocol to distribute its contents.

A Web-based distributor of online video content has filed a complaint with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, asking for traffic throttling be prohibited by ISPs. The petition was filed by Vuze, which uses the BitTorrent protocol to distribute its contents.

Gilles BianRosa, CEO of Vuze, said, "The ISPs cannot decide unilaterally what to do with third-party Internet services such as us," stressing the need of designing a solution that works and is fair.

Excerpt from PC World:

Broadband providers often promote their services as being necessary for watching video online, but then they slow access to a service like Vuze's, said John Fernandes, Vuze's vice president of marketing. "They say that they're engaging in reasonable network management, but what they're doing is slowing down some traffic," he said.

Additional information about Vuze:

Vuze, based in Palo Alto, California, distributes video in partnership with movie studios and television networks including the BBC, Showtime and PBS. It also distributes PC games, music videos, and audio files. Company officials say the Vuze client has been installed by customers more than 12 million times since the company, formerly called Azureus, rebranded itself in January.

We have previously reported on bandwidth throttling of the BitTorrent protocol by ISPs such as Comcast.

Do you think that this bandwidth throttling issue is serious enough to warrant the FCC's stepping in?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

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