Emerging Tech

Linking brain and machine, insect guides robot

Researchers at the Electrical and Computer Engineering department, University of Arizona, have developed a robot that is guided by electrical impulses from the brain of a moth.

Researchers at the Electrical and Computer Engineering department, University of Arizona, have developed a robot that is guided by electrical impulses from the brain of a moth.

An excerpt from LA Times:

Harnessing the electrical impulses of sight, scientists have built a robot guided by the brain and eyes of a moth.

As the moth tracks the world around it, an electrode in its tiny brain captures faint electrical impulses that a computer translates into action.

The researchers agree that these are but baby steps in developing machines that read and interpret brain signals to perform tasks. The repercussions of the research include designing machines for paralysis victims or deploying machines in hazardous situations such as bomb detection.

Think a little further and perhaps this technology will usher in the next era of user interfaces.

More information:

Living brain in powerful robot body tech goes live (Register)

Robo-moth can't flap, still likes flames (Engadget)

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