Enterprise Software

Microsoft blog post praising progress of Internet Explorer draws flak

Developers take exception to a blog post by Microsoft's Internet Explorer group program manager, in which various achievements of Internet Explorer were trumpeted.

Developers take exception to a blog post by Microsoft's Internet Explorer group program manager, in which various achievements of Internet Explorer were trumpeted.

In the blog post, Tony wrote that over 300 million users are now using IE 7, making IE 7 the second most popular browser after IE 6. Also, he noted IE 7 is already #1 in the United States and in the United Kingdom, and that IE 7 is expected to surpass IE 6 worldwide shortly. Other back-patting remarks are:

  • How IE 7's Phishing Filter stops more than 900,000 phishing attempts per week
  • A decrease of 10-20% in the support call volume for IE compared with a year ago
  • The increasing popularity of Extended Validation Certificates

He rounds it off with:

While we're happy with how well IE 7 is doing, as always, we continue to listen to our customers and find ways to further improve Internet Explorer.

Unfortunately, his words didn't seem to sit well with readers of the blog, particularly with developers, who readily poured forth their frustrations.

Wrote developer Ryan G:

"Instead of wasting our time with crazy back-patting uselessness, will Microsoft please just admit defeat and close up development of IE and hand [it] over to people who care about the Web and handle it properly? I have wasted so many hours developing sites to work in this browser that work without further modification in every other browser."

Agreeing, another developer lamented:

Everyone is in the process of implementing CSS 3 into their browsers, and I can't even develop a site that fully utilizes CSS 2 because of IE — and that includes version 7.

Andre probably rounded it off when he wrote, "Maybe 300 million Windows users have been forced to download IE 7."

Honestly, I really don't know, because I have been using FireFox for more years than I can remember.

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

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