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Microsoft blog post praising progress of Internet Explorer draws flak

Developers take exception to a blog post by Microsoft's Internet Explorer group program manager, in which various achievements of Internet Explorer were trumpeted.

Developers take exception to a blog post by Microsoft's Internet Explorer group program manager, in which various achievements of Internet Explorer were trumpeted.

In the blog post, Tony wrote that over 300 million users are now using IE 7, making IE 7 the second most popular browser after IE 6. Also, he noted IE 7 is already #1 in the United States and in the United Kingdom, and that IE 7 is expected to surpass IE 6 worldwide shortly. Other back-patting remarks are:

  • How IE 7’s Phishing Filter stops more than 900,000 phishing attempts per week
  • A decrease of 10-20% in the support call volume for IE compared with a year ago
  • The increasing popularity of Extended Validation Certificates

He rounds it off with:

While we’re happy with how well IE 7 is doing, as always, we continue to listen to our customers and find ways to further improve Internet Explorer.

Unfortunately, his words didn't seem to sit well with readers of the blog, particularly with developers, who readily poured forth their frustrations.

Wrote developer Ryan G:

"Instead of wasting our time with crazy back-patting uselessness, will Microsoft please just admit defeat and close up development of IE and hand [it] over to people who care about the Web and handle it properly? I have wasted so many hours developing sites to work in this browser that work without further modification in every other browser."

Agreeing, another developer lamented:

Everyone is in the process of implementing CSS 3 into their browsers, and I can't even develop a site that fully utilizes CSS 2 because of IE -- and that includes version 7.

Andre probably rounded it off when he wrote, "Maybe 300 million Windows users have been forced to download IE 7."

Honestly, I really don't know, because I have been using FireFox for more years than I can remember.

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

9 comments
alan.harding2
alan.harding2

after five years of microsoft windows i am fast loosing faith.i have just spent two exhausting weeks on my new shiny vista ultimate disabling, tweeking,cleaning, defraging, which is now running as fast as xp ever did.it took five years to get xp almost perfect i suspect a similar time frame for vista.no problems with ie (yet).what's with that error queueing,take a look in disk cleanup, delete and disable for me every time.

bboyd
bboyd

Its inherent lack of security is a real problem. This vision for the internet is what makes the vast majority of malware and virii possible. I only use IE when I've white listed a site that I need to implicitly trust. Otherwise Firefox and No-script plug-in hold the line very well. Problem is that people use MS centric design software instead of proper web design. MS word makes my email sig file 76kB for a text only sig that does not display correctly on most systems. I hand make it in simple HTML for 1kB and it displays properly on any system. People need to remember that flash, Java and active-x leave blind people out in the cold. They force people to open they're computers to possible malicious remote code. So far my white list is very short, when a site does not work right in Firefox I'm not likely to add it. Just leaving in disgust is my most common reaction. Everyday I find new better options to using MS and other "Big" companies software. They have lost control of there own corporate bureaucracy and its running itself. They have to buy and squash innovation. TR is one on the list, since I can't post a reply here without opening up my unsecure IE7. Must be counted in the "300million" users wishing for something better

Interested Amateur
Interested Amateur

I had cookies blocked in Firefox and continually got the login prompt. Could this be your problem with Firefox? Interested Amateur PS: don't forget to disallow cookies after leaving TR.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I'm running FF on XP at work and home, without No-script, and have no problem at either location. Try disabling your plug-ins individually.

Brazen1
Brazen1

I use Firefox exclusively on TR and never had a problem. Have you allowed it in NoScript? Just checking this page, I have zdnet.com, techrepublic.com.com, and revsci.net allowed in NoScript and (obviously) this posted just fine.

bboyd
bboyd

The real reason my TR doesn't reply right is the cross site linking that shouldn't be needed. If I allow secondary sites like com.com, zdnet and revsci.net it works but for the life of me why would I want to start allowing offsite directs.

seanferd
seanferd

it is the one you need to allow. Techrepublic.com.com Just check in the address bar. I thought it was odd how it was displayed as com.com in Noscript, but I immediately knew what it was as I had noticed this about the TR address previously.

anadirsitio
anadirsitio

i tryed to install Internet Explorer 7.0 and i coudn't get lot of errors. Nicso- http://www.anadir-sitio.com/internet/foros-para-webmasters/index2.php

kythri
kythri

So a little group of non-conformists who refuse to conform, not for a valid reason, but solely for the sake of non-conformity don't like IE7. Boo frickin' hoo, crybabies. Firefox is better? That piece of garbage has more memory leaks that a Microsoft product ever dreamt of - it doesn't even run without crashing on 4 different Ubuntu machines I've got setup (and they're all different vendor/different hardware). Face it - corporations aren't stupid, no matter how much you anti-capitalist idiots want to think. If IE was really as insecure and poorly performing as the pink-pantied Linux brigades make it out to be, then these corporations would jump to something different. The fact is, Microsoft makes good products that work well together, and while they may not be as technically superior or as flaw-free as a competitor's product, the overall collection of server software, applications and management/deployment utilities that Microsoft produces are vastly superior to the alternative hodge-podge that would have to be assembled and kludged to even approach the functionality provided by the Microsoft solution. Get over yourselves, and face the fact that more people use Microsoft, and the majority of them WANT to use Microsoft. Suck it up.