Microsoft

Microsoft bows to pressure to extend Windows XP's stay

Microsoft has bowed to pressure from customers and will allow large manufacturers to continue selling PCs with Windows XP preloaded until June 30, 2008. This is an additional five months from the original January 31, 2008 date.

Microsoft has bowed to pressure from customers and will allow large manufacturers to continue selling PCs with Windows XP preloaded until June 30, 2008. This is an additional five months from the original January 31, 2008 date.

If you recall, we reported just last week on how Microsoft has softened its stance and has been quietly allowing PC makers to furnish a "downgrade" to Windows XP for customers who request it. Allowing PC makers to furnish a downgrade, or selling it with XP preloaded, reduces the hassle to system administrators. This is especially true for larger orders.

Microsoft now plans to keep XP on retail shelves even longer. In fact, computer makers in emerging markets will be allowed to build machines with Windows XP Starter Edition until June of 2010.

Excerpt from Microsoft extends Windows XP's stay on News.com:

Kutz [Kevin Kutz is a director in Microsoft's Windows Client unit] said Microsoft had seen similar demand patterns with past releases and noted that in the past, old operating systems remained available for around 18 months after the release of a new operating system.

"While Windows Vista sales are still going strong... we recognize there are some customers that need more time," Kutz said.

Any wagers that the June 30 date will be pushed back again?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

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