Windows

Microsoft officially confirms Vista SP1 -- finally


Vista SP1Finally, after months of silence, Microsoft has finally came up with details about its plans for the first update to Windows Vista. According to Microsoft, the service pack will arrive in the first quarter of the 2008, with a beta of SP1 for Vista coming in the next few weeks to a limited group of 10,000 pre-selected testers.

The Vista update will mostly be a collection of existing fixes and tweaks targeted at increasing the stability and reliability of the system. Says Shanen Boettcher, a general manager in the Windows unit: "Its not a delivery vehicle for lots of features."

Some of the improvements that can be expected from SP1 for Vista, as highlighted by ZDNet Blogger, Mary Jo Foley:

  • Support for Direct 3D 10.1
  • Support for Secure Digital (SD) Advanced Direct Memory Access (DMA) to improve transfer performance and decrease CPU utilization
  • Performance tweaks pertaining to copying of files, shut down, and resume
  • Support for ExFat, the Windows file format for flash memory storage and other consumer devices
  • Improvements to BitLocker Drive Encryption to allow not just encryption of the whole Vista volume, but also locally created data volumes
  • The ability to boot Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) on an x64 machine
  • Improvements to battery life by reducing CPU utilization be “not redrawing the screen as frequently, on certain computers”
  • Improvements to Internet Explorer 7 performance by reducing CPU utilization and speeding JavaScript parsing
  • Bugs, bugs and more bugs

A point to note is that the final size of Vista SP1 that Microsoft communicated to beta testers is only about 50 MB -- this is the size of the SP as it will be delivered via Windows Update and Windows Software Update Services (WSUS) only.

The total size for the standalone SP1 will be in the region of 1 GB for x86 systems. Microsoft has clarified that the 1 GB for the standalone installer was due to a design decision to put all the various language packs into a single release. Anyway, it appears that you’ll need 7 GB of free disk space to install the x86 version and 12 GB of free disk space for the x64 package. (most of this space is for temporary files and for the Vista image-based installer).

It is not clear at the moment whether the 7 GB of free disk requirement relates only for the standalone installation only or if this requirement is also applicable for the Windows Update and WSUS route. If that is so, it might pose a problem with businesses that installed the OS on a dedicated (smaller) partition.

For more information:

Is your organization waiting for SP1 to roll out Windows Vista?

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About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

14 comments
Cashup.theman
Cashup.theman

I Think That Vista Sucks Cause every time i installed new hardware i had to reactivate vista

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

Does Microsoft use a file encryption system or is there something in the computer scrambling Microsoft?You would think that any file,like a dll for instance,could be opened in a text file or a notepad and you would see the computer commands as written.

Genera-nation
Genera-nation

There WAS always going to be a SP1 for Vista. I do not see the herald of a service pack as exciting news, just admission on behalf of the software company that the Gold copy was not good enough. This will be a rushed or non-essential service pack just to get the 'do not install until SP1 is out' people to do just exactly that on release!

texty32
texty32

Edited Message was edited by: beth.blakely@...

barrie.duke
barrie.duke

Our PC, printing and scanning equipment will probably not go beyond XP and SP3. However rather than assume that Vista is the next step with a large budget spend we are considering web hosting for the organisation's management system leaving our current workstations with a simple task - to connect to the net and run Open Office. What use for Vista then?

nickb
nickb

Vista is great for watching those pretty effects and annoying password prompts. Because you a spend lot of time waiting. Especially when you combine it with office 2007. Everything is slow and everything is moved... Surely it must be tiem for the open document standards to take off so you don't need to get new office just to read documents.

Oktet
Oktet

"Especially when you combine it with office 2007. Everything is slow and everything is moved..." I have not had the chance to combine my free Vista from MSDNNA with Office 2007, I opted for Open Office. I am running a dual boot with Windows XP and Vista Business on a two partition 74GB Raptor Hard drive and have not had any problems in terms of Vista running slow; in fact, Vista runs faster than my Windows XP.

paulmah
paulmah

Is your organization waiting for SP1 to roll-out Windows Vista?

UncleRob
UncleRob

The winxp desktop platform is stable and performs well given the right hardware and maintenance. Plus WinXP is still only at SP2 and Vista is already coming out with SP1? Can someone please explain any real valid incentives to deploy Vista on user desktops/laptops? Security is not an issue in the corporate landscape - regular user accounts are setup as restricted users to eliminate issues associated with spyware & viruses. The training necessary to equip users with a vista skill-set is currently cost-prohibitive for larger companies. For the most part, machines running Windows XP SP2 for the past 2,3,4 years will require replacing to run Windows Vista at the same performance level. Vista doesn't offer any performance increases over XP as far as I've noticed. Plus not all applications that currently run well in an XP environment will be guaranteed to run as well in a Vista OS environment. Upgrading technology needs to be done in order to meet goals that are associated with improving a company's bottom line. Upgrading to Vista for the sake of running the newest operating system doesn't accomplish this as far as I can tell. Can someone explain to me what advantages they will have running Vista on the user desktop? It can't be because of easier system deployment, vista imaging & deployment tools have improved over what was available for XP but we've been running XP at our end for a few years and we've developed systems for quickly rolling out user machines so there is no advantage to be seen there plus having an improved system deployment process isn't a valid reason for upgrading to the next windows version. Isn't anyone worried that the shortened development life cycles for these operating systems may have negative consequences for them. XP is already being replaced after only receiving Service Pack 2? XP SP3 may come in 2008 but you don't hear Microsoft talking alot about it. Vista already has Service Pack 1 in the works, when it goes to SP2 it will be considered old and have a replacement os for it as well. Why not just skip Vista and wait for it's replacement. - heck...it may possibly be only 2 years away. ;-) just my 0.02 cents, feel free to agree/disagree.

Jim_MacLachlan
Jim_MacLachlan

Last I heard, XP SP3 was pushed back yet again until the first half of 2008. My last new Dell PC with XP SP2 installed took about 100 patches (not an exageration!) & a dozen reboots to put into production. It's way past time for SP3. With this kind of customer care, we may not be moving to Vista at all, but moving to Linux with Open Office.

sgunelius
sgunelius

My previous employer would never consider messing with a Microsoft product until they had released SP1, so now that we'll have a more stable product, we can begin testing. http:\\www.itechtips.com

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I don't think anybody in an institutional environment installs anything from Microsoft before the first service pack. We'll probably wait for at least 6-8 weeks after the SP before we get serious about it. Sometimes the SP's cause problems; I know, that's hard to believe...