Windows

Microsoft praised for interoperability strategy

In a CNET News.com report just last week, U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly praised Microsoft for its interoperability strategy.

In a CNET News.com report just last week, U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly said that the changes have been both "very interesting" and "dramatic" and that it "does seem to represent quite a change from Microsoft's previous approach over the years."

Commending the company for recent steps designed to make its documentation more accessible to open-source programmers, she said "I'm glad people aren't afraid to make changes when it's brought to their attention."

In fact, Microsoft's general manager Bill Hilf said that the Windows source code is "irrelevant for what people want" and is better off closed, according to the Reg Developer. In this video (YouTube) from Jean-Baptiste Su of Uberpulse.com, Bill said:

"They don't want source code, they want to write an application like we can write an application: they want to know how does Outlook talk to Exchange."

This actually makes complete sense. What developers want is the programming interfaces and communications protocols for popular Microsoft products. However, this does reveal Microsoft's earlier moves to offer licenses to the source code of the Windows server operating system as mere smoke screens.

Still, with Microsoft's recent pledge not to sue open-source developers for products that connect to Microsoft software, could a real wind of change be happening over at Redmond?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

5 comments
Jaqui
Jaqui

Microsoft would do better to make their software use the standard protocols instead of the proprietary ones their software currently implements. and they are wrong about people not really wanting the source code. until I have the source code, NOT ONE product that MS produces is standards compliant. [ I have to be able to go through the sources to believe any claim for standards compliancy, since operationally, nothing meets any of the applicable standards. ] http://www.iso.org/iso/en/CatalogueDetailPage.CatalogueDetail?CSNUMBER=27632&ICS1=35&ICS2=40&ICS3= Information technology -- Security techniques -- Evaluation criteria for IT security -- Part 1: Introduction and general mode Evaluation criteria for IT security -- Part 2 : Security functional requirements Evaluation criteria for IT security -- Part 3: Security assurance requirements just 3 examples of STANDARDS that MS FAILS to meet for ALL their software. edit to add: By failing to meet those same 3 standards Use of Microsoft software in ANY corporate environment is an AUTOMATIC FAIL of data protection laws.

carlsf
carlsf

They just want everyone locked into MS standards. Then they can charge us even more for LESS.

Jaqui
Jaqui

what a joker you are, MS garbage is a better label.

ShannonHenley
ShannonHenley

One War at a time in our World is enough,probably? When we're children,at some point,most of us are taught to share. Save the Internet is most likely a sound idea (concept)that most all of us should probably be promoting. Wherever all of this conveniently fits into to that, is most likely where we need to be headed for the whole world to benefit from it,and to insure a positive future for the vast majority. This is not being said to ruin everyones day!

paulmah
paulmah

Still, with Microsoft?s recent pledge not to sue open-source developers for products that connect to Microsoft software, could a real wind of change be happening over at Redmond?

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