Windows

Microsoft pulls Viridian features to avoid delays


ViridianMicrosoft is changing three key features of the initial version of its Viridian hypervisor technology in an attempt to make its schedule of releasing Viridian within 180 days of completing Windows Server "Longhorn." This decision gives competing projects, such as Xen and VMware, more breathing room.

Learn more about which features are being taken out of Viridian in the CNET Networks' News.com story: "Microsoft cuts Windows virtualization features."

For additional information about Viridian, take a look at these other news sources:

Do you think Microsoft's decision to get a product out the door on schedule, albeit missing some features, is the right one? Join the discussion.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Stay on top of the latest tech news
Get this news story and many more by subscribing to our free IT News Digest newsletter, delivered each weekday. Automatically sign up today!

About

Mary Weilage is a Senior Editor for CBS Interactive. She has worked for TechRepublic since 1999.

8 comments
NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

"This decision gives the software giant more time to complete projects such as Xen and VMware" So MS are working on Xen and VMWare?

MaryWeilage
MaryWeilage

Microsoft is changing three key features of the initial version of its Viridian hypervisor technology in an attempt to make its schedule of releasing Viridian within 180 days of completing Windows Server "Longhorn." Do you think Microsoft's decision to get a product out the door on schedule, albeit missing some features, is the right one?

MaryWeilage
MaryWeilage

Dear TheTechMail, I appreciate you pointing that out. I have updated the post. Thank you, Mary

carlsf
carlsf

The user gets what MS wants to give you when they want to give it to you. BUGS, UNFINSHED. What more can you expect from MS

jeff.anderson
jeff.anderson

This is just a normal way that Microsoft does business. They always push out products before they are complete and fully ready to release. I do not agree with their decision.

Ian Thurston
Ian Thurston

...which is: Are the missing features UNNECESSARY for use of the technology by 80% of the user base? If so, it's the right decision. is the product as proposed for release SUFFICIENT for 80% of the user base? If so, it's the right decision. Is Viridian hypervisor the only alternative for 80% of the user base? If not, it's probably the wrong decision for microsoft, but the right decision for us. Is software expected to be perfect and complete? If so, you're living on the wrong planet, and shouldn't even be reading this.

tomb
tomb

And its the only one that really matters. It's not a product until it ships.

raykaville
raykaville

I have Vista to prove it. Loaded with useless junk and it takes forever to find what you want. If you need help, there are voluminous mounds of reading material to assist you, but who wants to read a volume when you're trying to do something simple and it should be intuitive? I thought with NT and 98 they had changed their ways, but it's not so. Still putting out buggy products and expecting the consumers to send them "error reports" so they can sort them out. The consumers erroneously expect an expensive software product to be error free, and usable. Stupid consumers. The big brother software parts work fine though. It's all a matter of what's important to whom. f.

Editor's Picks