Cloud

Microsoft testing free data storage for end users


Microsoft is current beta testing free data storage for end users as part of its new Windows Live hosted services. Assuming all goes well with the 5,000 beta testers currently trying it out, Windows users could well be receiving the invitation to sign up for this free service by this fall.

As reported by eWeek here:

Windows Live Folders, a hosted system for storage of personal files ... [it] will give users 500MB of online storage at no charge. The maximum file size supported will be 50MB.

According to Adam Sohn, a Microsoft marketing director for online products, this was developed in response to customers wanting to unify their "stuffs" into a single location.

The service will give every user three types of root folders: personal, shared, and public. The personal folder is exactly what you think it is, whereas shared folders allow an end user to precisely specify who gets to see and change what.

A public folder, on the other hand, is wide open for modifications by anyone. The ramifications of some bloke uploading undesirable contents into one's public folder remains to be seen.

Given the increasing momentum behind SaaS, it seems inevitable that online storage of personal files will gain mainstream acceptance soon. After all, most of us already use some form of hosted e-mail providers or hosted software -- wikis and blogs come to mind.

Microsoft says online storage is what we want. What do you say?

Comments, rants, or flames? Join the discussion.

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

5 comments
T Mike
T Mike

heck yea, not like this hasn't been tried before....& so they now want 'in' -T Mike

paulmah
paulmah

Would you ever store your personal files on-line?

GeekGaroo
GeekGaroo

No, not at this time. Anything with the word "free" attached to it usually means some unknown charge or consequence, thereby increasing the end-user's risk.

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

Online data storage could be cool if it were secure.There's probably screen name and password protection here.I'm wondering if they're just farming out a Federal site.There would have to be something like infinite storage for them to be confident in its success.You could be anywhere and access these files.

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