Windows

Microsoft to allow all versions of Vista to run as guests on a VM

Reversing its earlier stance, Microsoft is now saying that it will allow users to run Vista Home Basic and Vista Home Premium as guest operating systems on a virtual machine. Previously, users had to purchase the most expensive Vista Business and Vista Ultimate versions to do so.

Reversing its earlier stance, Microsoft is now saying that it will allow users to run Vista Home Basic and Vista Home Premium as guest operating systems on a virtual machine. Previously, users had to purchase the most expensive Vista Business and Vista Ultimate versions to do so.

This is probably welcome news for Mac users who would like to run the latest Windows version on their Mac hardware.

In a telephone interview on Monday with CNET News.com, Microsoft group product manager Patrick O'Rourke said: "Now is the right time, we believe, to make it easier for technical enthusiasts... to experience and see if virtualization is right for them."

No further explanation is offered for the reversal in its decision except that "There was some internal discussions still occurring at the time."

Will you personally benefit from Microsoft's move?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

6 comments
CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

At work I'm testing Business in a vm already. At home I'm running XP Home and have no desire to test, upgrade to, or purchase any flavor of Vista. I'm one of those types that never replaces my home OS, running what came with the box until it's replaced.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Each to there own of course but I couldn't do it. I also can't bring myself to buy a prebuilt unless it's a laptop mind you but if I ran the stock OS I'd still be using win95 on my cf27. For me, the software is how I've always explored the limitations of computers due to hardware costs being mostly unatainable in my much earlier years. PDA class devices are the only area where I can bring myself not to see the logic and the hardware as two seporate pieces of lego (no firmware replacement for PalmOS and Maemo doesn't need replacing).

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

MS Money; SiteSpinner, a GUI web page creator; three or four games from Popcap; Firefox; Office 03. I think that's about it. My five-year-old Dell came with XP Home, and I don't have any applications that require me to upgrade. If I put more stress on a box I probably would have investigated building my own. With such low-demand apps it didn't seem worth the trouble (and still doesn't).

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

True, if it's just a commodity that does a set list of functions then there's no reason to muck about with it. I can't leave well enough alone with my own machines (enter VMs for mucking up instead of host install). My wife's computer takes that aproach though too; it does what she wants so we don't muck with it.

paulmah
paulmah

Will you personally benefit from Microsoft?s move?

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I won't buy it outright because I'd require business Ultimate to properly explore it's full functionality and the cost does not justify day to day use let alone hobby collecting. Licenses turn up though (legally) so when I get given an old machine with a key sticker on it or recieve a license through work for job related needs then it'll become a VM. Hopefully by the time that all games are DX10 the game industry will have pulled it's head out of its.. well, started writing with openGL or something else less restrictive or Vista will be a dime a dozen (about it's justifiable worth).