Windows Server

Microsoft unveils release candidate of Hyper-V

Microsoft has unveiled the release candidate of its hotly anticipated Hyper-V virtualization technology, which the company says is "near final." Does your company have plans to deploy Hyper-V on an enterprise level when it is released?

Microsoft has unveiled the release candidate of its hotly anticipated Hyper-V virtualization technology, which the company says is "near final."

When released in August, Hyper-V virtualization technology will become part of Microsoft's Server 2008 operating system. However, Microsoft said that it will be possible to license the server operating system without Hyper-V, if desired.

Mike Neil, Microsoft's general manager for virtualization strategy, wrote in a blog post:

"This milestone is important to the hundreds of customers and partners in the early adopter programs, and those of you trialing Hyper-V on your own, because it’s feature complete, better performing than the beta, and you’ll have a better experience using it. "

Many improvements have been added, among them performance fixes pertaining to scalability and throughput, as well as substantial performance for Hyper-V VMs using pass-through disks. Additional guest support has also been added, with support for Novell SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 SP1, Windows Server 2003 (x86) SMP, Windows Vista SP1 (x86), and Windows XP SP3 (x86).

Do note that the release candidate for Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V is only available for x64 editions of Windows Server 2008 RTM. You can access more details here, or download the RC update.

Does your company have plans to deploy Hyper-V on an enterprise level when it is released?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

8 comments
BALTHOR
BALTHOR

You almost do not need Microsoft.If you could access the real BIOS you would see that it is all automatic.Everything in the system is detected and then delegated.

NaughtyMonkey
NaughtyMonkey

:)

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Here's what comes out of my poor abused grey mush assuming the three posts are duplicates: The bios detects all the hardware in a system provided it sticks to plug and play standards these days. The bios is also the lowest level of the software stack and sits between the OS and the hardware. This means that an OS which talks to the bios properly should be aware of all the hardware and resource allocations already done by the bios during boot. I see that failing with new hardware on older bios firmware updates. Also, the bios may know of the hardware and it's irq but the OS still has to understand the functions available too it and how they are used. gah.. that dentist said his fancy drugs would wear off in a few hours and that was days ago.. cold... soo.. ccold.. (or maybe I guesse right.. who knows really) :)

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

You almost do not need Microsoft.If you could access the real BIOS you would see that it is all automatic.Everything in the system is detected and then delegated.

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

You almost do not need Microsoft.If you could access the real BIOS you would see that it is all automatic.Everything in the system is detected and then delegated.

NaughtyMonkey
NaughtyMonkey

There is no point in dealing with switching to Microsoft so we will be on a limited system that has not been proven. VMWare has been doing it a long time and understand the market and customer needs better than Microsoft probably ever will.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

When I can install the MS virtualization offering over a Linux or BSD kernelled host OS then it'll be worth a look.. somehow, I bet that's not on the development roadmap. Heck, with VMware, you won't need the host OS at all soon. Sadly, we may also be seeing the start of another better technology loosing out too a better marketing department. Who knows though; we'll have to wait until MS-hyperV comes out of release candidate.

paulmah
paulmah

Does your company have plans to deploy Hyper-V on an enterprise level when it is released?

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