Web Development

Mozilla and Microsoft fight over the next version of JavaScript

Mozilla's CTO and JavaScript creator Brendan Eich and Microsoft's Chris Wilson engaged in a war of words through their blogs about the next version of the JavaScript language.

Mozilla's CTO and JavaScript creator Brendan Eich and Microsoft's Chris Wilson engaged in a war of words through their blogs about the next version of the JavaScript language.

An excerpt from Ars Technica:

Wilson and other critics have complained that their concerns are being suppressed and ignored by Brendan Eich and others. Several participants in the ES4-discuss mailing list claim that Adobe and Mozilla are authoring the spec in a manner that best suits their interests without consensus and that other parties are simply shouted down or ignored.

Eich and those who are satisfied with the current process and direction regard those allegations as FUD—baseless nontechnical criticisms that add nothing of value to the ECMASCript 4 process.

The crux of the argument lies in the concept that Microsoft proposes to develop a completely new language standard for Web scripting with support for the existing standard. Mozilla's Eich feels that the move would only stall all the existing code in the present ECMA 3 standard and, at the same time, negatively affect a uniform implementation of the standard.

With the Web galloping on the technology front, controversies like these are bound to have a grave impact. There's also the question as to whether a new standard is required at all.

More information:

As elicited in the Ars Technica article, do we need a new standard for Web scripting or a refinement of present day languages like Python and Ruby?

3 comments
zen71001
zen71001

So Microsoft wants a new standard for web scripting? This is so depressingly familiar. Ten years ago Microsoft were trying to break the open standards of the web. They did not want open standards then and they don't want open standards now. They want Microsoft proprietary standards used everywhere. This is simply yet another attempt to de-rail open standards. If you are working in the web area you should take a moment to google "Microsoft Halloween document" http://www.catb.org/~esr/halloween/halloween1.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween_documents. Seemingly in ten years nothing changes but at least we can discuss Microsoft's current involvement in the Javascript debate with an informed mind.

pr.arun
pr.arun

As elicited in the Ars Technica article, do we need a new standard for Web Scripting or a refinement of present day languages like Python and Ruby?