Hardware

NEC claims it built the world's fastest vector supercomputer

NEC claims to have developed that fastest vector supercomputer in the world. The SX-9 is capable of calculating 839 teraflops.

NEC claims to have developed that fastest vector supercomputer in the world. The SX-9 is capable of calculating 839 teraflops, as against IBM Blue Gene/L's 280.6 Teraflops performance.

Here's a quote from Computerworld:

NEC also noted that the SX-9 features what it calls the world's first CPU capable of a peak vector performance of 102.4 GFLOPS. The company claims the new supercomputer closes in on the PFLOPS range, or 1,000 trillion calculations per second.

NEC's claims are yet to be officially benchmarked. Supercomputing organizations worldwide have been investing in machines that can breach the Peta FLOPS barrier. NEC's focus on vector computing is not exactly in tune with times when cluster computing is stealing the show. Vector computers have been steadily losing share in the supercomputing space to cluster machines that are constructed from general purpose CPUs.

The effort to top the supercomputing charts has official sanction from the Japanese government, with NEC, Fujitsu, and Hitachi striving to complete a 10 Peta FLOP supercomputer by 2012 (InfoWorld).

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