Networking

New BlackBerry does Wi-Fi calls

According to PC World, T-Mobile has announced the BlackBerry Curve 8320 today. Essentially a BlackBerry Curve, it adds 802.11 b/g Wi-Fi as well as the much coveted ability to make VoIP calls via Wi-Fi. <br /><br /> In fact, it appears that T-Mobile will be directly marketing 8320's Wi-Fi calling ability as part of its Hotspot@Home system, which costs an extra $10 per month for unlimited calling from Wi-Fi hotspots.

According to PC World, T-Mobile has announced the BlackBerry Curve 8320. Essentially, this model is a BlackBerry Curve with 802.11 b/g Wi-Fi and the much-coveted ability to make VoIP calls via Wi-Fi.

In fact, it appears that T-Mobile will be directly marketing 8320's Wi-Fi calling ability as part of its Hotspot@Home system, which costs an extra $10 per month for unlimited calling from Wi-Fi hotspots.

Excerpt from the article:

While you can use public unencrypted networks, call quality is much better at home using a specially-tweaked router that T-Mobile sells for $49 (with a $50 rebate, so it's essentially free). When I reviewed Hotspot@Home, I experienced trouble with handing off calls between Wi-Fi and cellular networks — but that was months ago, so I'm looking forward to seeing if handoffs have improved.

The T-Mobile BlackBerry Curve 8320 is going for $249 with a two-year contract.

If anything, it is apparent that the convergence of entertainment, VoIP, push mail, and even access to enterprise systems into handheld devices is going to speed up. Consequently, it is inevitable that the scope of IT departments' responsibilities (as well as qualifications) in these areas will need to increase.

On this page, is a new training budget relatively easy to come by, or do you face the problem where senior management automatically assumes that since you're the "experts," you should somehow already know it all.

How do you IT professionals and managers out there cope every time a new technology hits the mainstream?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

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paulmah

How do you IT professionals and managers out there cope every time a new technology hits the mainstream?

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