Open Source

New York Stock Exchange opts for Linux

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) invested heavily in x86-based Linux systems and blade servers in its NYSE Hybrid Market trading system that was launched last year. More than flexibility and cost, the key desire from this new computing architecture is technology independence.

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) invested heavily in x86-based Linux systems and blade servers in its NYSE Hybrid Market trading system that was launched last year. More than flexibility and cost, the key desire from this new computing architecture is technology independence.

Excerpt from the New York Times:

[NYSE Euronet CIO] Rubinow said that Linux is mature enough to meet his needs. The open-source operating system may not have all the polish of Unix technologies with 20-plus years of history behind them, "but it's polished enough for us," he said.

Rubinow prefers not to be closely aligned with proprietary UNIX, such as HP-UX and even IBM's AIX and Sun's Solaris. Still, the NYSE continues to run numerous UNIX systems, especially ones with Solaris, which has the ability to run on multiple hardware platforms.

Interestingly, the article notes one technology that the NYSE isn't adopting: server virtualization. The cited reason is the overhead, something that the system, which processes hundreds of thousands of transactions per second, cannot afford.

Rubinow notes: "Virtualization is not a free technology from a latency perspective, so we don't use it in the core of what we do."

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

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