Software Development

Nokia issues recall for 46 million batteries


A product advisory has been released for the Nokia-branded BL-5C battery manufactured by Matsushita Battery Industrial Co. Ltd. of Japan between December 2005 and November 2006.

It appears that in very rare cases, the affected batteries could potentially experience over-heating while charging. This is caused by a short circuit, which could make the battery dislodge. Nokia is still investigating the situation with the "relevant local authorities."

While world-wide battery recalls are practically a dozen a dime nowadays, 46 million batteries still represent a staggering amount. Of course, most people will probably just miss the advisory or don't bother. So, it remains to be seen whether a full 46 million little parcels of BL-5C will end up being whisked around the globe.

What few people are aware of is that lithium ion batteries are considered quite volatile relative to the other types of battery technologies available. Hence, the appropriate cut-offs must be built into batteries and devices, which drives up the cost. These safeguards are generally more than adequate to the task -- until a manufacturing defect gets overlooked.

It is unclear who will ultimately bear the cost of replacing the batteries.

You can read 3 Things You Should Already Know About Your Lithium Ion Battery, which I wrote, or hop over to check out the original Nokia product advisory on the Nokia BL-5C battery.

This brings us to the question of the day:

Join our discussion on how do you dispose your obsolete rechargeable batteries.

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

5 comments
mymy_ohmy
mymy_ohmy

Nokia did the right thing by recalling its products which it suspected to be defective.But even though unintentional,it creates a panic reaction and all the retailors who have sold Nokia phones must be cursing the company as they have to face the wrath of the buyer.Thanks for writing a good article.I was able to check the number of the battery and it was a relief to know that the battery in my wifes phone is ok.Thanks again for providing the link to Nokia site.

paulmah
paulmah

Personally, I would probably been just as happy to receive a free battery after having used the "defective" one for a few months or more. :) But glad to hear that there's no cause for panic on your end. Personally, I am having a blast of a time writing and I am glad to hear that it has blessed you. And of course, positive (and negative) feedback is always welcome as it helps us improve by telling us what we're doing right (or wrong!) You have a great day ahead!

pforce76
pforce76

I decided - just for interest sake, as I have owned several Nokias over the years - to read the article on the recall in detail. Imagine my surprise to discover that the model I currently use (6230i) was one of those affected. Imagine my further surprise and concern to discover that the phone I have been using for over a year has one of the "recallable" batteries! I have noticed in the last few weeks that when I insert my phone into the hands-free car charger cradle, it sometimes behaves oddly - turning itself off and making dubious clicking noises. Now I wonder whether this behaviour is more sinister than I actually thought! I will be waiting for that replacement battery, and using my old Qualcomm CDMA phone in the meantime! Cheers and thanks for the warning. Noel Goddard

paulmah
paulmah

Hi Noel, Its comments like this that makes my heart go warm and fuzzy so as to speak. And become more determined to bring more of the latest news :) Glad that the article helped! You have a great day ahead.

paulmah
paulmah

How do you dispose your obsolete rechargeable batteries