Networking

Packeteer announces platform for optimizing application performance across WAN

Packeteer, a global leader in WAN application delivery, announced its product, IntelligenceCenter, for single-point monitoring and optimization of application and WAN performance, which can scale up to 2,500 of its appliances.

Packeteer, a global leader in WAN application delivery, announced its product, IntelligenceCenter, for single-point monitoring and optimization of application and WAN performance, which can scale up to 2,500 of its appliances.

An excerpt from VNUnet:

Packeteer says that IntelligenceCenter can monitor average and peak network utilization, response times, connection-related statistics and other network statistics, by application and host on a network-wide basis.

The system can also report on Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) usage, configuration and compliance for all applications, providing IT admins with a granular, network-wide view on application performance, "All the way down to specific users at specific sites" Packeteer said in a statement.

The IntelligenceCenter system provides a Web 2.0-based single sign-on interface for configuring, performance monitoring, and policy enforcement on up to 2,500 of Packeteer's PacketShaper, iShaper and iShared appliances. The IntelligenceCenter consists of Console, Reporting Module, and Data Collector.

There are a number of vendor solutions for application performance acceleration across a distributed environment, but the bigger question is whether a single approach will meet all the requirements for the enterprise.

More information:

Packeteer seeks to optimize WAN performance (TechWorld)

Packeteer sharpens tools for managing WAN application performance (NetworkWorld)

Packeteer® Rolls out New Unified Central Management System for Complete Intelligent WAN Application Delivery (BusinessWire)

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3 comments
Tig2
Tig2

But business really needs to understand first what they REALLY want. If it is a single solution that can give the greatest value, then in my opinion, Packeteer is a definite contender. If, however, what is wanted is a total end to end solution, Packeteer is a tool set within a larger solution. The decision point is to determine what you really NEED to monitor. And I think that is where things get out of hand. Determining if a solution is the correct one is going to be based entirely on understanding your business requirements. Do you really need to have every packet that goes across your network analyzed, logged and dissected? Why? Maybe you do need that, but you also need to understand that no single package will give you that level of control. And you had better be ready to define a return on the additional investment. There is much good to be said for a single tool to monitor. But no matter how good the tool, if you don't clearly understand what your needs are, you can easily find yourself not getting all that you wanted. Edit- Corrected title spelling

Sonja Thompson
Sonja Thompson

According to blogger Arun Radhakrishnan, "There are a number of vendor solutions for application performance acceleration across a distributed environment, but the bigger question is whether a single approach will meet all the requirements for the enterprise." What are your thoughts?

gthomps5
gthomps5

A useful ability of a monitoring tool is to identify applications that are badly suited to WAN deployment (hopefully before they are deployed :) ). For example an application that is fine on a LAN may be unusable on a WAN, regardless of the WAN's speed. e.g. if the application requires a stream of small queries to a database server to make a single response to a user then response times may be unaacceptably long, due to summation of the latency times. I have experienced a spectacular example of this, where two very similar programs performed very differently over a WAN. So it is not simply a matter of managing a fixed amount of traffic. Feedback to application developers should also be a factor in the overall process.

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