Hardware

Researchers at Arizona State University develop new massive memory technology

Researchers at the Arizona State University's Center for Applied Nanoionics (CANi) have developed new memory technology that could be 1,000 times more efficient than today's USB and flash memory devices.

Researchers at the Arizona State University's Center for Applied Nanoionics (CANi) have developed new memory technology that could be 1,000 times more efficient than today's USB and flash memory devices.

An excerpt from PC World:

The problem that CANi has been tackling is the physical limit of how much storage can be crammed into any given space as pushing atoms closer together causes more heat to be formed. PMC, which has been developed in conjunction with German institute, the J|lich Research Center, works by altering the way that ions are treated.

Programmable metallization cell (PMC), as the technology is called, results in the motion of charged particles between electrodes creating a change in resistance. The great news about the technology is that it relies on present day materials. The even greater news is that the technology may be on the market within the next 18 months.

More information:

ASU researchers give memory a boost (D-Silence)

1 comments
lastchip
lastchip

This could have far greater consequences than just flash memory sticks. Providing costs can (as indicated) be controlled, solid state hard drives could indeed become a reality. Look at the physical size of 1GB of laptop memory and imagine it's now has a 1000 times more capacity at 1TB. It's mind blowing stuff, but I am making an assumption, that 1000 times more efficient translates to capacity. I wonder if that's true?

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