Processors

Revenge of the AMD (processors)


ProcessorAt long last, it appears that AMD's native quad-core Barcelona chip will finally arrive in the month of August. Called the "Quad-Core Opteron," the first of the Barcelona chips will run at speeds of up to 2Ghz and come in both standard and low-powered versions. The first Barcelona servers are expected to come in September.

Because the Barcelona will use the same 1,207-pin socket already in use by the company's dual-core Opteron, users will be able to swap in the new quad-core processors with a relatively simple BIOS upgrade.

Some analysts said that the initial clock-speed of the Barcelona is below expectations, though Randy Allen, vice president of AMD's server division promised that the company will be releasing faster versions soon after the initial launch.

Quote of Randy Allen from The Daily Tech Rag:

More than ever before, customers are expecting energy-efficient and performance-per-watt leadership as much as absolute performance. With this new reality of computing, greater performance at the expense of greater power consumption is non longer an option.

AMD has prioritized production of our lower power and standard power products because our customers and ecosystem demand it, and we firmly believe that the introduction of our native Quad-Core AMD Opteron processor will deliver on the promise of the highest level performance-per-watt the industry has ever seen.

AMD is not sitting still on the dual-core front either. It will be offering dual-core Opterons starting August 6, at speeds of up to 3Ghz.

You can read more about AMD Ramps Up Dual-Core Opterons to 3GHz (eWeek).

Do you prefer Intel or AMD-based servers?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

14 comments
fLaKeYjAkE
fLaKeYjAkE

the only time a chip failed me was when I didn't keep the heat-sink free from dust build-up.

pcdoc
pcdoc

Iam a compute repair facility. i have been repairing p.c.'s fo almost 30 years. i keep 2 boxes of processors that have failed due to overheating. in one box is intel chips 52 of them in the other boxis amd chips 12 of them as you can see i prefer amd as they run cooler and last longer than intel!

nakul_mondal
nakul_mondal

i am purchased windows vista home basic. it is loaded laptop.my another pc install windows xp and this pc install HP DESKJET 1280 printer. and it is shared. but when i print from my laptop to hp printer very slow. shy? my email add nakul_mondal@rediffmail.com

El Guapo
El Guapo

Where's George Uo when you need him?

paulmah
paulmah

Do you prefer Intel or AMD-based servers?

donaldcoe
donaldcoe

PC's on the other hand, AMD takes the PRIZE because of the ability to take it up a notch when you just have to fudge. When the motion of the ocean is without burps both AMD and Intel serve very well without a notice or a tag of which processor is on-board. I have heard the complaints, but they do not hold any salt, cause if lack the hardware skills you can't fix ailment.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

OK, I've been using PCs since the days when they were called micro-computers, started with a Commodore 64, used a Superbrain, and myriads of others. Since the late 1980s, I've used hundreds of Intels 286, 386, 486 DX and SX variants, Pentium Is, IIs, IIs, IVs, Celerons and had only 1 chip that went faulty within the first year, and that was immediately replaced under warranty - had three other chips fail, but they were all over 15 years old and had spent a lot of time sitting around turned off. In the last four years I've had two AMD chips, both went belly up, one after 12 months, one after 7 months - took both back to the approved AMD supplier I got them from, and was told no warranty coverage at all. Contacted an email address I was given for AMD, and got no answer at all - I gave up on them after 12 months of no reply and several follow up messages by me. In every case, be it Intel or AMD, I installed the chip perfectly (I am a qualified computer hardware technician), and used the supplied cooler system provided by the manufacturer. I never over clocked the systems - stock standard CPU set ups in each case (that's what's designed to give you the optimum life span on them). Since the issue with the AMD chips, I've been told that you HAVE to get extra cooling capability for any AMD chip, as the standard cooler isn't good enough. Well, my answer to that is "If the company is so bad as to ship the chips with crappy coolers that don't really protect the chip, then they don't want my business - as it shows they can't do basic design processes." I have a nephew who's had five AMD chips over the last 8 years, all gone faulty within 4 years of purchase, and he did put in extra strong coolers. Yet the Intel Pentium system I bought him back in 1996 is still going well, and suits his young son fine. I just KNOW I'm going to get flamed by some people over this, but I only call it as I see it from my own experiences and observations. Please feel free to have differing opinions. edited to fix a typo

Pieter
Pieter

AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD AMD

masungit
masungit

well your are not alone, i think a lot of people have experienced those similar problems, but my amd driven pc still works and its been quite some time now (8 yrs), but I just hope that eventually their current and future products will be free from these issues.

Digicruiser
Digicruiser

I've had Intel's and AMD's and the AMD is my fave. I am can confirmed the lack of the heat sink ability on the AMDs BUT most of the problem is the heat build up in the case. By now we have many cases with extra fans ridding the heat inside, so really it shouldn't be an issue. My "Main machine" out of 6 gets used brutally but doesn't go over 40c - the case fans are doing their job on the 3Ghz machine. I think it is obvious to expect to have this setup, not only to rid the heat in the case but help cool down the system components - what is the point of blowing encased heat onto the chip when you should be ridding it? Rid the excess internal heat and the AMD CPU will be very happy at near to full throttle at very long periods.

Jwagdy
Jwagdy

The title sums it up. You got some bad luck with those AMD processors my friend. 1st of all I am from Cairo, Egypt which is quite hot place in the summer. Right now I am in Dubai, UAE and I work as a data center administrator. The 1at PC I ever had was a Commodore 64 in the early 1980s, after that I got an Intel 286, followed by a 486 DX2 in 1990 which I changed a couple of years later to a Cyrix PR233. A couple of years later I sold the Cyrix PC and bough a new PIII 450MHz PC which I used for quite a while till end of 2001. That was when I got my 1st AMD based PC. The 1st AMD I bought was a AMD Athlon 1400 which later I changed it in 2004 to a new AMD Athlon 2800 which I still have. I am thinking, however, these days of giving it away and buying a new AMD Athlon 64 X2 5200 based PC. Regarding the warranty, try as hard as you can to buy it from AMD directly with the 3 year warranty. Simply because most of the 3rd party distributes are a bunch of thugs. The max you will get is 1 year and if you had an unfortunate accident they will try to come up with a million excuses not to change your chip. To be fair regarding the heat issue, AMD processors was good in the old days (386, 486) till they came out with the K5, and K6 models to compete with Intel PII and PIII, which was a disaster in terms of heat. That cheap was damn hot and nothing worked with it unless you have the PC in an air conditioned room. However, after AMD bought NextGen things changed specially after coming up with their different processor architecture and dumping CISC based processor design and coming up with the new M/B design using NextGen team. Although the heat issue was still going around by the time I got my AMD Athlon 2800, I didn't suffer from heat problems except in the very hot summer days when temperature went about 42C (the processor would go to 70C). But frankly I can't blame AMD for that issue as it is as a business will design its chips with the average temperatures in mind. And frankly, with the increasing speeds in GHz which means by the way an increase in the watts used and that will lead to more heat (it doesn't matter Intel or AMD). I think in the next 2 to 3 years, we will see a 10GHz plus PC. So you tell me, what kind of cooling solution do you have for such a system? The way I see it, liquid cooling systems are the solution. If you want to forget all about the processor temperature, get yourself a good liquid cooling system. Finally, I am not sure where you live but if you live in Europe or northern US or Canada and you still have a heat issue, then there could be something wrong with the processor/ MB configuration. From my point of view, AMD processor is the best in the market and I am not changing back to Intel anytime soon till a see something that really works.

bjterry62
bjterry62

Needless to say, your luck stinks. I've purchased and used 6 AMD processors and 2 Intel processors in the last 6 years and NONE have failed. Installed all myself and overclocked some (and I am NOT an IT professional) Also, whoever said there was no warranty was lying to you. I also have never had an issue contacting AMD for ANY reason. BT

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

for some time. My biggest complaint is they provide a cooler system with the unit, and it's supposed to work in the average range of environments, yet it doesn't do the job properly. One acquaintance who'e very big into AMD says they don't worry about the coolers, as most REAL AMD users ALWAYS over clock, and thus ALWAYS buy bigger coolers, so they don't care about what's shipped with the chip. Well, that's a good reason to sell chips with and without a cooler, but those sold with one should have a cooler that does the job properly. BTW: I live in Australia, and both were bought and used in Canberra, which isn't excessively hot or cold. Most days are between 10 to 30 degrees celsius, a major heat wave could get as high as 42 degrees c, but that didn't happen with either of these two going belly up. Also, buying direct from AMD is almost impossible here in Aust, can be done over the Internet, but much more expensive. I'm clearly in the category, 'once bitten, twice shy.' I've had two out of two bad events with AMD, so I stay away - others have ahd better, so I say 'Good luck to them.' The Intels do what i want, so I'm happy to stay where I am at the present.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

emphasis on tried, to contact AMD in both Australia and their head office. The local guy, their official agent, said there was no warranty as it wasn't installed by an AMD approved installer - at that time, a lot of hardware companies were going down this flipping route 'warranty voided unless installed by some one authorised by them.' When I set it all out for AMD and got no reply, I tried again, and eventually gave them up as a bad deal - at least here in Australia. They may be better over seas. I know with Intel, you take the chip and your receipt to the shop you bought it at, they give it a quick test in their system, give you another, and send the first off to Intel. I expected the same thing with AMD, didn't get it. I did get one AMD authorised dealer in another city, offer to send it off to AMD for them to test for me, and he'd send any replacement on to me, but I had to pay for the freight to ship it to the AMD head office. from here, that's a lot of money. It wasn't my primary machine so I just sidelined it and tried to contact AMD direct - it died off old age when I next cleaned up house. Not worth the trouble to me.