Microsoft

Safari 3.1 brings the Apple experience to Windows

The good folks over at Ars Technica decided to check out Safari 3.1 for new goodness fresh out from Mac-land. Their verdict? They were blown away with the improvements since Safari 3.0.

The good folks over at Ars Technica decided to check out Safari 3.1 for new goodness fresh out from Mac-land. Their verdict? They were blown away with the improvements since Safari 3.0.

The chief kudos here appears to be with that Safari 3.1 brings in support for CSS Web fonts and animations, as well as improving on existing support for SVG and HTML 5. Performance improvements rolled into this release certainly did not hurt, but standards compliance is where it really shines.

Excerpt from Ars Technica:

Standards compliance is impressive. Safari 3.1 scores a 75 on Acid 3, compared with a 53 on Firefox 2.0.0.12, 40 on Opera, and a paltry 12 on IE7 (I only looked at official releases, not betas; Safari on the Mac also scores a 75). Apart from sites using ActiveX and other browser-specific tech (like WM DRM), I had no trouble using sites in my normal browsing rotation, either. I had no trouble accessing American Express, Gmail, Citbank, Yahoo Mail, Digg, etc.

However, some users have complained of repeated crashes of Safari 3.1 on Windows. It does not seem to afflict everyone though, so it might be an issue that afflicts users of certain hardware or software configurations only.

On a separate note, Mozilla's chief executive, John Lilly, has hit out at Apple for including its Safari browser as a default add-on installation in an update for its popular iTune software.

So which is your favorite Web browser on Windows?

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About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

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