Hardware

SanDisk launches Cruzer family of USB flash drives with hardware encryption


SanDisk has just launched a pair of USB flash drives dubbed the Cruzer Professional and Cruzer Enterprise for business users on the Windows platform. Both of these USB flash drives offers password protection as well as data security via built-in hardware-based 256-bit AES encryption.

Targeted straight at the SMB, as well as the enterprise segment, the Cruzer Professional features a password-protected “Privacy Zone” that can be set to any percentage of the drive’s total capacity. All data that is stored inside this “Privacy Zone” will be automatically encrypted.

The Cruzer Enterprise, on the other hand, offers mandatory password protection for the entire drive, with all files being encrypted.

Both Cruzer Professional and Cruzer Enterprise are billed as true plug-and-play devices, requiring no software installation whatsoever on the host system.

You can find out more from SanDisk’s press release here.

Does the Cruzer Professional or Enterprise sound like something you would get for yourself or recommend for corporate-wide use? Join the discussion.

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

4 comments
paulmah
paulmah

Does the Cruzer Professional or Enterprise sound like something you would get for yourself or recommend for corporate-wide use?

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I have a few concerns: - did Sandisk use better chips than they used in the 1 Gig Cruzer Titanium drives? (Sure the case withstood 2000 pnds but the chips inside rotted out in a month on average) - Why is it Windows only? This one is a dealbreaker for me. I need something that supports multiple platforms not another product that chooses my OS for me (Windows is only 10% of my network). Release non-MS client side software for your encryption paring or release specs so the software can be developed for you. I do like that they have used hardware encryption. My conserns are only that they used quality components and provide the software or means of developing the software for more than one platform. Until then it's just another product forcing decisions on the consumer.

NaughtyMonkey
NaughtyMonkey

I agree with Neon about the limitations. Our network has many variations of Solaris and HP Unix platforms, Windows, and linux for examples. I have just written and implemented a security policy in which we provided Corsair flash drives for everyone to encrypt files and maintain passwords. I looked at some SanDisks, including the Titanium, and found too many bad reviews to be comfortable buying 100 4GB flash drives, but have had great luck with Corsair, Kingston, and Crucial. It is a great idea, but the drives will have to stand the test of actual use by real people before anyone would feel comfortable deploying them throughout the entire company.

paulmah
paulmah

It does seem that SanDisk is marketing it solely at the Windows crowd first (majority of market?). I happened to go shopping for a desktop today, and it appears that all the other flash drives with "encryption" achieve it using a Windows-based encryption software. So perhaps we just need to keep our fingers crossed and hope that the other players will have on-board encryption soon as well as open-source it! :)