Storage optimize

Share USB 2.0 devices over your LAN


USB 2.0 devices over your LANWeary of running a desktop just to keep USB devices online or of connecting them to your wireless laptop by entangling cables? Keyspan has upgraded its three-year-old USB Server design with its new USB 2.0 Server, which connects a pair of USB 2.0 ports (with half an amp of power on each port for peripherals) to a 10/100 Ethernet LAN.

Bi-directional communication allows print job, paper, and ink or toner remote monitoring of a connected printer. A hard disk could be added to serve as a basic NAS system. Connecting devices over a LAN eliminates problems caused by the standard 10 meter (33 feet) USB cable distance limits. USB audio/video equipment and USB hubs are not yet supported, but both PCs and Macs can use the server to connect to peripherals.

This joins IOgear's multi-function USB server to a very short list of USB-LAN adapters that permit a broad variety of devices.

Is sharing USB devices important to your office?

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12 comments
MWRMWR
MWRMWR

I've used lan-Usb print servers and fallen foul of the 2-way operation for scanners and found the cost/benefit for 2-way operationb tricky. For this disk and scanners handling device, it too is a bit expensive compared to using an old laptop, but I guess you pay extra for the neat packaging, diskless operation conveniences (oh and maybe a M$ license if reviving a dead PC). Will certainly consider, however, I think Keyspan ought to kick their UK distributors as none feature it on their web-sites yet; so that's an import job or procrastination for me.

Gone Fishing
Gone Fishing

It would be nice if someone could just share any port on a pc For dos/windows a command like this Net share port1=usb1 or usb2 Net share port2=com1 or com2 Net share port3=lpt1 or lpt2 Net share port4=keyport Net share port5=mouseport On the other end Net use usb1=\\hostpc\port1 Net use com1=\\hostpc\port2 Net use lpt1=\\hostpc\port3 Net use keyport=\\hostpc\port4 Net use mouseport=\\hostpc\port5 So much easier than device names Then we just have to worry about drivers DM

paulmah
paulmah

I wrote them last week and they're be sending me an review set. Would be interesting to see how easy it would be to use it. Stay tuned folks! :)

K7AAY
K7AAY

Is this a product in search of a user, or does this meet your business needs?

g01d4
g01d4

If, e.g. you work in a lab. I've used USB frame grabbers, DAQs and spectrometers. It'd be nice sometimes to not to tie these devices to a particular computer. The vendor site says print and storage server so I'm guessing it's limited to those types of devices.

clteo
clteo

This is only theoretical but handhelds with WIFI but no USB eg. PDAs, mobile phones (iphone?), Skype phones, might possibly do things like 1) Print SMS to USB printers 2) Print email attachments from mobile phone to USB printers 3) Backup mobile phone directly to USB drive eg. phonebook, SMS, voice, video 4) Upload/dowmload mp3 files to USB drive 5) Scan images to mobile Again, assuming the necc drivers are available.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

Other than sharing a USB printer (which I assume is possible) what would I use this for? Can I use it to share a scanner, for example?

Gone Fishing
Gone Fishing

Some companies make scanners that can be shared over a network They now make printer scanner combos that connect to the network Some are wireless These are good if you have a laptop with a wireless adapter

Gone Fishing
Gone Fishing

It depends on which manufacturer What operating system The scanning software I have heard of some scanners working with these types of devices I have never seen it happen first hand Getting any scanner to work over a network is tricky so you need to know a lot about networks and scanning software Some people will say why bother you have to put the paper to be scanned in the scanner so why use it over a network The first reason is this You will not have to interrupt the person using the pc the scanner is attached to The next reason is this Some scanners have sheet feeders So you can do it from your own desktop pc If you have 100 sheets to scan you don?t have to wait by the scanner If you choose to use one of these network USB devices Go to the website of the company that makes them Look for info about what scanners or other devices they support If you don?t find what you want send them an email

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

...can "ordinary" scanners (those not specifically designed to be used over a network) be access via this kind of device? That is the question I am most asked.