Software Development

Start-up to build motion-charged electric batteries

Start-up M2E Power said it has raised money to commercialize battery technology that converts motion to electrical energy.

Start-up M2E Power said it has raised money to commercialize battery technology that converts motion to electrical energy.

What the company is trying to do is apply the long-understood Faraday Principle -- that is, putting a conductor near a magnetic field will produce enough voltage to power 21st century gadgets.

M2E Power has found that two hours of motion is enough for one half to one hour of talk time on a cell phone.

M2E Battery

How does it work? According to CNET News.com:

Magnet and coil generators are typically too large for use in mobile electronics. The company's technologists have been able to generate enough electricity to power small devices by manipulating the electromagnetic field that is produced when a coil moves near a magnet, explained Rowe [Director of business development]. It has patents in magnetics and coil structures.

Its initial prototypes include a magnet attached to a spring, wire coils, circuitry, and a traditional battery to store electricity.

The current plan is to create a D-size battery suitable for use by the military. Batteries for consumer electronics will follow.

The idea is that, within a few years, there will be mobile electronic appliances with specially designed motion-to-energy batteries built-in.

I don't know about you, but I might not move around enough to properly recharge the batteries. Anyway, what category of electronics do you think will benefit most from this technology?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

5 comments
Jacdeb6009
Jacdeb6009

The idea may be neat, but it's not new. Seiko have been doing this for some time with their Kinetic range of watches. Moving around winds the mechanism but also charges a device which will give you "back-up" power for up to one year when fully charged.

paulmah
paulmah

what category of electronics do you think will benefit most from this technology?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Although I thought cell phones already had motion-charged batteries. Every time I see one in use, the person holding it is walking back and forth, back and forth ... :-D

lesko
lesko

...wait for it batteries for Wii controllers hehehe

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