Open Source

Sun to acquire MySQL in $1 billion deal

Sun Microsystems will fork out $1 billion to acquire open-source database company MySQL. The bold deal is expected to close later this year, but Sun will begin offering support services to customers of MySQL before that time.

Sun Microsystems will fork out $1 billion to acquire open-source database company MySQL. The bold deal is expected to close later this year, but Sun will begin offering support services to customers of MySQL before that time.

MySQL's revenue over the past year is estimated to be in the $60-$70 million range.

Excerpt from CNET News.com:

MySQL, founded in 1995, is one of the most successful open-source companies. It's part of the popular combination of open-source development products referred to as LAMP, for Linux Apache Web server, MySQL and the PHP development language, which is broadly used on the Internet and within companies.

MySQL CEO Marten Mickos will join Sun's senior executive team after the transaction closes.

Sun CEO and president Jonathan Schwartz call the deal the most important acquisition in the history of the company. He says, "This is really about one thing: reaffirming Sun's position at the center of the Web, the platform for the Web economy."

Sun intends to sell its hardware and additional software to the 75 percent of MySQL's customers who run on non-Sun hardware.

There is concern in some quarters on potential issues that might arise with competing database products, such as Oracle and PostgreSQL. Sun has traditionally enjoyed close ties to Oracle, and it has invested in PostgreSQL. Company executives say they will continue to support PostgreSQL and continue to partner with database giant Oracle.

Do you use MySQL in your company? Does MySQL's impending acquisition by Sun affect any of your strategic plans?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

11 comments
FilipVR
FilipVR

Are trackbacks broken? I tried to add one but the trackback URI is giving an empty reply.

Jaqui
Jaqui

TR blogs have to have trackbacks manually added by the blog author, they do not automatically show up.

FilipVR
FilipVR

... but I think they still should give the XML response snippet in that case, rather then return an empty answer. Whatever.

Jaqui
Jaqui

since Mysql is available under the GNU-GPL Sun can't stop anyone from having a copy and [b]making it available free of charge[/b] if they wish under the GNU-GPL. The only change will be in the enterprise licensed version, which is a commercial license. Yet any company can use the free GNU-GPL version without buying a commercial license, as long as they are willing to accept the restrictions imposed by the GNU-GPL.

rpitera
rpitera

...since the weight of Sun may lead more enterprise level devs to work in the platform which would benefit everyone in the community. But in the sense that this isn't *bad* news (or overtly great news) you're spot on.

DanLM
DanLM

Could they be doing this to remove or just place on the far backburner a competing database? Sun already has a few database's they support. They do alot of buisness with Oracle. MySql could be making inrodes into those markets and this is a way for Sun to stop/slow these inrodes by just not spending as much effort in further development. This is my only concern... Dan

Jaqui
Jaqui

since anyone can make a legit copy of the sources, call it a fork and have it out there with a lot of the developers from Mysql coding for them, free. That is the beauty of the open source licenses. one the source is available, it is always there and anyone can start improving the software. Sun can try, but anyone with the sources can start working on it.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

A few people might end up renegotiating their support agreement with MySQl for the enterprise version, a good few could find out they don't really need that support, and that it was just an executive comfort blanket. Certainly everytime I've used it, it's been simply to provide a backend for an in-house mis / internet app, haven't seen it modified and deployed as part on another application, which is where the license terms might impact.

paulmah
paulmah

Do you use MySQL in your company? Does MySQL's impending acquisition by Sun affect any of your strategic plans?

g.dodd
g.dodd

Yes we use MySQL for our website, webshops and for internal use. What concerns me is Sun's intentions for the future. Will development stop or go in a direction other than GNU-GPL, will they still develop for the community ? Anyone remember RAV Antivirus - a great product we used in our company, was bought by Microsoft and closed down. I will be watching this closely

mchibuye
mchibuye

I have used MySQL with java web technology and I think that sun taking offer will mean better support for MySQL and personally im moved to continue using it