Networking

Swedish woman receives the world's fastest broadband


A 75-year-old woman from Karlstad, in central Sweden, has been bestowed with what we can only salivate and dream about at the moment -- the world's fastest broadband connectivity.

At the blistering speed of 40 Gigabits per second pumped straight to her home, Sigbritt Löthberg is now able to enjoy 1,500 simultaneous streams of HDTV channels. Alternatively, when her eyes get tired, she can always switch to downloading whole DVDs just for kicks - at the rate of one every two seconds.

You must be scratching your head now wondering how a 75-year-old lady ended up with a 40-Gbps pipe. Well, she is the mother of Swedish Internet legend Peter Löthberg no less, who arranged the connection together with Karlstad Stadsnät, who is the local council's network arm.

So says the network boss of Karlstad Stadsnät, Hafsteinn Jonsson:

"This is more than just a demonstration... As a network owner, we're trying to persuade Internet operators to invest in faster connections... We wanted to show how you can build a low price, high capacity line over long distances."

The entire setup was made possible due to a new modulation technique that allows data to be transmitted directly between two routers of up to 2,000 kilometers apart -- without the use of any transponders in between.

You can read more about Sigbritt, 75, has world's fastest broadband. (The Local)

Tell us, what do you use your broadband for?

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

24 comments
AT Computers
AT Computers

I have Comcast High speed Cable Internet With 24 Mbps speed. My cable connection is 60 Feet from an RF Amplifier. Comcast just recently installed this amplifier, before the installation I was at 3 Mbps Internet Speed. I'm Glad To See This Amplifier Installed.

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

The information transfer rate of the Internet is limited only by the orbital frequency of the electron.That frequency,in our world,would be infinite.It can even go faster than that!There is truly no frequency limit to the Internet.The terrorists teamed out computer virus.She must have defeated a terrorist team.(That speed is probably even faster that copy/paste in her computer)

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

As the orbital frequency of the electron approaches infinity, the radius of the electron's orbit approaches zero. As it is both a quantum and physical impossibility for the electron to contact the proton in the nucleus of the hydrogen atom and remain an electron, your postulate fails. Edit: clarify

manwethegreat
manwethegreat

Agreed. Besides, balthor (how long ago did you take physics/chemistry?) you are not accounting for things like interference along the way, the number of nodes (routers, etc.) it must go through. And remember, companies charge by bandwidth usage, so they are providing an intentional "bottleneck", so that people only get what they have paid for. Someone has to pay for the infrastructure that data is being transmitted & processed on. And I have no idea what your comment about terrorists had to do with this conversation.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

But this was irresistible. He posted and it was actually comprehensible, so I had to answer to point out the quantum impossibility.

seanferd
seanferd

Balthor ... [i] says things [/i] Sometimes it seems like a case of schizophrenia, but no one knows what is really up with Balthor, although theories abound. You just gotta take Balthor as-is. I was just shocked to see 2 posts in one discussion. Rage on, BALTHOR.

Larry the Security Guy
Larry the Security Guy

Paying for a high-speed onramp to a somewhat slower Internet superhighway seems a little counterproductive and disingenuous of the provider. At home I have a cable connection that regularly clocks at 5.5mbps, and my work connection regularly exceeds 10mbps. But real-world throughput rarely tops 3mpbs, including live non-HD streams (I haven't tried an HD stream yet). If I had to pay for speeds over 3mbps, I'd probably turn it down.

pethers
pethers

I totally agree - it's not very often you find that content off the Internet can keep up with your 3Mbps+ connection. There is always some bottleneck that is congested that effectively limits your actual speed experienced to below about 1-2Mbps. Some sites are very fast and my connection is maxed on download.

paulmah
paulmah

Like the MSDN subscription that I hold at my workplace. The last time I tried downloading from MSDN, I was able to completely max out my 6.5mbps broadband. Have not tried yet since they upgraded my broadband to 12mbps, though I suspect it might well max up too. (Don't you love competition?) My point is, where paid sites is concerned, any speed limits, if at all, will be set way higher. But if you're talking about say P2P, I've not seen mine go beyond 2mbps, even at short spurts.

Jaytmoon
Jaytmoon

75 yo lady that know how to use a 'puter? 1. Amazing 2. difficult to believe 3. just a ploy for the installer to get new toys!

meryllogue
meryllogue

!!!

Jaytmoon
Jaytmoon

I've just been around some really great but technically challenged eldrly for too long. I'm 55 and consider my self fairly well connected. I help seniors at the Library and the Sr Centr. My mom (86 yo) still has trouble with a tv remote, so, Yes I'm a bit of an Agist (and REALLY Jealous of that Lucky lady's BB connection)!

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

One of my aunts, now well over 75, was the first person on my mother's side of the family to go on-line and she's still going strong.

gardoglee
gardoglee

My 85 year old mother is unable to use a touch-tone phone because the'keyboard' scares her too much. Near by her lives another 85 year old woman who started her programming career on plug cards for IBM accounting machines, I think during World War II, worked with machines in which you walked through racks of electromechanical relays, and continued doing network development into the nineties. I think she would be able to find something interesting to do with a 40Gb connection. Old is not the same as ignorant, nor the same as stupid.

jdawg
jdawg

Is that just download speed? I would love to have a fraction of that just for upload speed!

paulmah
paulmah

What do you use your broadband for?

k_chatterjee
k_chatterjee

Of course I use it to surf net :=); now for what ? Ah .. just for any thing .. for news, Tech-news, teaching my son, studying for myself [ there are some excellent Univs out there with their course ] , and my son often palys on - line games.

Freebird54
Freebird54

though I could use nice fraction of what she has - sometimes. The rest of the time the comp can't keep up anyway :) What *DOES* worry me is the implication ([i]hardest part was installing Windows[/i]) that she is running Windows with that access. I sure hope she doesn't join a botnet! There is quite enough spam around as is.... (yes - I know there is an expert on call for her - thank heavens!)

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

because one person has 40 gig connection they'll be crying that there's now a huge bandwidth gap in the US I'm sure granny only uses it up to 35 Gbps to visit the online store, on sunny sundays.

Neil Higgins
Neil Higgins

When my isp,"upped the anti",and increased my broadband from 4mbps,to 10mbps,all for a little extra cost (not),I thought long and hard before saying yes.What do I need that hyper-speed for? Surfing the web,sending emails,paying Apple for tracks I like. Watching "vids",via uTube is a lot easier,but as I dont play games on-line (at my age?),even web pages sometimes stall,not often,and a dreaded error message,occassionally can be irritating. A 40mbps broadband-link may sound terrific,and good luck to those that get it,and to all the bods (mad scientists in white coats),who make it happen,but unless my isp decides to offer pay-as-you-go movies straight to my desktop,I'm happy with what I've got.Even then,I'd probably opt out,as I can easily rent a new movie from a local store.

tokunbo007
tokunbo007

Too much of everything is another problem altogether

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