Developer

Texas Instruments creates a better battery gauge

It appears that Texas Instruments has gone ahead and adapted its fuel gauge laptop battery technology to work with handheld devices. This technology will enable users to accurately gauge the remaining runtime left in their mobile devices with just one percent margin of error.

It appears that Texas Instruments has gone ahead and adapted its fuel gauge laptop battery technology to work with handheld devices. This technology will enable users to accurately gauge the remaining runtime left in their mobile devices with just one percent margin of error.

TI's battery fuel gauge technology is currently used in millions of notebook computers. Due to market demand, TI has integrated its "system-side fuel gauge integrated circuit (IC) with its impedance track technology." The resulting component, called bq27500 allows fuel gauge functionality to be extended to handheld devices.

The interesting bit is how the bq27500 is able to accurately predict battery life even as the battery ages.

Excerpt from PC World:

The IC analyzes precise state-of-charge by correlating between a battery's voltage and cell impedance (or resistance), and its current integration to adjust remaining state-of-charge up or down the predicted discharge curve.

The bq27500 directly measures the effect of a battery's discharge rate, temperature, age and other factors to predict remaining life within one percent error. By measuring and storing real-time battery impedance values, the IC automatically adjusts to changes in full capacity as a battery ages. State-of-charge and full capacity are calculated from the voltage and impedance measurements, eliminating the need to re-learn from a charge and discharge cycle.

The bq27500 is currently for sale as a 2.5 mm x 4 mm SON package.

Do you have problems with misleading battery readings that go from a partial charge one moment to completely flat in the next instant?

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About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

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