Web Development

Too much on your plate? Outsource your life on DoMyStuff.com

If you're as busy as I am this time of year, you might want to check out a nifty little Web site called DoMyStuff.com. This site not only contains tasks or chores that people post in specific locations, but people in that area can bid on the work that's posted.

Podcast

If you're as busy as I am this time of year, you might want to check out a nifty little Web site called DoMyStuff.com. This site reminds me of an science experiment, where someone decided to crossbreed Craigslist and eBay -- we could even get with the times and call it a hybrid Web site.

DoMyStuff.com not only contains tasks or chores that people post in specific demographic locations, but people (let's call them "assistants") in that same area can bid on the work that's posted. Need someone to rake your lawn? Clean the leaves out of your gutters? Cook your Thanksgiving Day meal? Do the crazy Friday-after-Thanksgiving super sales shopping for Christmas presents? [Added: For all you IT folks, tasks could include updating your server, backing up your database, troubleshooting system errors, or answering those help desk tickets.] All you have to do is create a free account and then post your errands on the site. People will bid on your post during the specified time and location. You'll select an assistant, put the money in DoMyStuff's online escrow account (where it will stay until after the job is completed, at which time your assistant will be paid), and communicate with your assistant via DoMyStuff's message board system.

Ok, so I haven't actually used DoMyStuff.com, but I think the idea behind it is brilliant. To hear a little more about the company, listen to the podcast. David Davin of DoMyStuff.com fields my questions about the company, including the search feature, filtering mechanisms, and the most bizarre request that he's seen on the site thus far.

Do you have stuff (work, chores, errands) that you would entrust to an assistant?

About

Sonja Thompson has worked for TechRepublic since October of 1999. She is currently a Senior Editor and the host of the Smartphones and Tablets blogs.

6 comments
Tig2
Tig2

And potentially quite handy. Although I do have some reservations still since a woman in my community was murdered while responding to a Craigslist advert for a nannie. While I know that incident is a one off kind of thing, that doesn't mean that it couldn't happen again. I will have to watch this one. It looks like it could be interesting. Thanks, Sonja! Edited because I can't spell!

Sonja Thompson
Sonja Thompson

Do you have stuff (work, chores, errands) that you would entrust to an assistant on DoMyStuff.com?

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

do my job, complete and accurate and still only take a percentage??? :^0

ganyssa
ganyssa

that I have too much stuff on my plate because I have no ability to delegate. The only things I can think of that I would let someone do - the ones that I don't hold onto because no one else can do them right - I can't let some random stranger do. I really don't want the lowest anonymous bidder knowing where my lawn is to rake it, or where my gutters are to clean them.

Menopausal
Menopausal

Because everyone who drives down your street knows where your lawn is, and they can probably see your gutters, too. My husband used to shred every piece of mail that came with our name and address on it, while I said that only the ones where the combination of our name PLUS the business that sent it to us mattered (ie knowing where we bank, etc.). "Well I don't want people to have our name and address!" I got out the phone book and showed him our name and address...right there in front of God and everybody... no more shredding incidental mail. Just 'cause it's on the web, it's not any different.

kingttx
kingttx

I personally see a big difference between a phone book listing and the junk mail you get. Although it's possible to get your identity stolen from the phone book, that junk mail gives a thief MUCH more information. Plus, if they manage to forge your signature and return the offers (like credit cards), they get the card. I'm not sneaky enough to know how they do this, but it is done over and over and over again. Shredding junk mail is actually a very good idea. If you are worried about your phone number being listed, ask for an unlisted number. It may cost a little more but it gives you a bit more obscurity. Uh oh, "security through obscurity"...did I open another can of worms? ;)

Editor's Picks