Networking

U.K. government in support of anti-file-sharing laws?

Lord Triesman, the parliamentary Under Secretary for Innovation, Universities and Skills told the BBC's iPM programme that the U.K. government may consider legislation against illegal file-sharing on the Internet.

Lord Triesman, the parliamentary Under Secretary for Innovation, Universities and Skills told the BBC's iPM programme that the U.K. government may consider legislation against illegal file-sharing on the Internet.

An excerpt from the article:

While he said that the government had no interest in "hounding 14-year-olds who shared music," it was intent on tracking down those who made multiple copies for profit.

"Where people have registered music as an intellectual property, I believe we will be able to match data banks of that music to music going out and being exchanged on the Net," he said.

While the premise for such legislations seems legitimate enough (considering that free sharing of content could kill creative artist's means of living), the age-old question remains as to how you can design a system that does not impinge on user's privacy but nets illegal file downloads at the same time.

The article states that the U.K. government's preferred position is to not interfere if the ISPs and content creators voluntarily collaborate on arresting illegal file sharing.

There is sufficient anathema to any sort of legislation on the sharing of content on the Web, but the bigger question is, what alternative model incorporates the best of P2P and is monetarily sustainable?

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