Windows

Upgrading from Vista to XP

If you've already done your Christmas shopping and are just hanging around the house for a quiet evening, you might want to check out this tongue-in-cheek blog post about the pros and cons of upgrading from Vista to XP.

If you've already done your Christmas shopping and are just hanging around the house for a quiet evening, you might want to check out this tongue-in-cheek blog post about the pros and cons of upgrading from Vista to XP.

Excerpt of the blog posting's conclusion:

Microsoft have really outdone themselves in delivering a brand new operating system that really excels in all the areas where Vista was sub-optimal. From my testing, discussions with friends and colleagues, and a review of the material out there on the web there seems to be no doubt whatsoever that that upgrade to XP is well worth the money. Microsoft can really pat themselves on the back for a job well done, delivering an operating system which is much faster and far more reliable than its predecessor. Anyone who thinks there are problems in the Microsoft Windows team need only point to this fantastic release and scoff loudly

Hopefully, Vista SP1 that's slated to be released in the first quarter of 2008 will resolve most of these issues.

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

11 comments
john3347
john3347

I am pleased to see the Vista to XP called what is actually is -- an UP-grade. I have a Vista Home Premium machine and it is truly a step backward from XP (which is also a step backward from Windows 2000). I installed SP1 on the Vista and it made the computer go faster, but it screwed up several applications to the point that they literally would not run even poorly. Even the SP1 RC problem reporting website would not work (probably overloaded). Microsoft's own SyncToy will not work in SP1. A couple of other applications that work in the pre-SP1 version don't work with SP1. I thought that SP1 was supposed to make more of our older programs work or work better with Vista. The exact opposite has happened on my computer. I had to un-install SP1 to restore previous level of performance. Microsoft should return to the most stable productive OS they have ever produced without all the "fluff and puff" of both XP and Vista. Windows 2000 SP12 anyone?

techgecko
techgecko

I upgraded to XP+SP3beta after 6 weeks of use on my new laptop. Now this finally feels like he new machine i thought I was buying! It was not so much what Vista did for me but how long it too to do it!

geekfelix
geekfelix

Yup, me too. I had struggled with Vista Home on one of those low priced Acer laptops for sale everywhere. I finally loaded XP and paid MS an additional $150 to activate it. The lesson is, just buy a Dell laptop with XP already installed. Laptop RAM has gotten quite inexpensive and 2GB will make XP jump. Anybody having fun with XP SP3 yet?

emaarkhan
emaarkhan

Well i love Vista because it good networking and sharing center and few other stuff like finding drivers on net automatically. i am always fascinated by cool graphics. so that why i love vista but i been trying to configure Apache and php and its been 1 week its not working. now i am trying to go back to xp. i hafta do Sacrifice.

amj2010
amj2010

if ALL have been rewritten, kernel and all, there must be a terrible mistake made by mikeysoft reading the article... why in the world should mikeysoft do that? they ain't crazy moneywise...this a lot of bullshit...so please cut the crap and start talking business.

steven
steven

You can keep on hoping SP1 will fix Vista's problems because I can tell you from installing the RC1 package that it does nothing to fix the cpy and move files over a network to a non-Vista machine http://www.winextra.com/2007/12/15/vista-copymove-the-service-pack-1-rc1-follow-up/

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

Sounds to me like it's a problem with rights management or on another machine on your network. I have Vista on my machine at work and copies just fine to anywhere. I can copy to Xp pc's, 2003 Server, 2000 Server, my virtual pc's (Xp, 2000 and Ubuntu...using a share for Ubuntu of course, not exactly a copy and paste ordeal) and all of my network storage devices with no issues. I have problems with only one storage device that uses a Linux OS...and supposedly they are working on an upgrade to correct this.

john3347
john3347

I was able to transfer files between my XP machines and my Vista machine until I installed SP1 on the Vista. After uninstalling SP1, I was again able to transfer files. I don't yet know how XP SP3 is going to interact with other machines on the home network.

Alfa11
Alfa11

I've been using Vista for several months now and never experienced the problem you described. In fact, I've just finished copying about 4 GBs of information to an XP machine and everything worked like it's supposed to be.

meridenscrafts
meridenscrafts

One of the most common problems encountered in configuring a dual-boot between Windows XP and Windows Vista happens when you try to install Windows XP on a computer with Windows Vista already installed. When you install Windows XP, it'll remove the Vista bootloader and use its own instead. If you follow these instructions, you should be able to add Windows XP to a system that already has Windows Vista ? with minimal headache and no loss of data. Prepping the Machine for an XP Installation The first thing to do is to get your system ready for installing Windows XP. There are a couple of things you need to do: Already Have Free Space? Do you already have a free partition or a separate physical disk that you can install Windows XP to? If so, skip on to the next section. 1. Download the free GParted Live CD or use a commercial partition editor, and boot into it. 2. Use the partition manager to shrink the partition with Windows Vista to make enough room at the end of the drive for Windows XP. 3. Add a new primary partition located after the Windows Vista partition you just shrunk. Make sure it is a primary partition and formatted as NTFS. 4. Reboot It's very important to make sure that this partition was created at the end of the drive, or else you might no longer be able to boot into Windows Vista because your partition numbers have changed. Installing Windows XP Warning! If you're installing Windows XP to a separate physical drive, do not disconnect the Vista one, nor change the drive boot order in the BIOS. This will not help and will make it terribly difficult to get your dual-boot working again! You cannot install Windows XP by running the installer from within Windows Vista, instead, you'll have to boot from the CD: 1. Make sure your BIOS is configured to boot from the CD. Some computers also let you press F12 to pick where you want to boot from ? you may use that option instead. 2. Put your Windows XP CD in the drive and press a key when you see the "Press any key to enter Windows Setup..." message. 3. If you're installing Windows XP to a SATA drive, make sure you hit F6 to load the SATA drives. 4. When you're presented with a screen that has a list of hard drives and partitions, use the arrow keys to select the empty NTFS partition you created in the previous section, then press Enter to continue. 5. Let Windows XP setup finish. Setting up the Dual-Boot Once Windows XP setup has finished, it'll automatically boot you into the newly installed copy of Windows XP ? note that you will not be able to boot into Vista at this point, nor will you see a boot menu option for it. 1. Once in Windows XP, download and install the Microsoft .NET 2.0 Framework. 2. Download and install the latest version of EasyBCD. 3. Once in EasyBCD, go to the "Manage Bootloader" page, and select "Reinstall the Vista Bootloader" then "Write MBR" to get the Vista bootloader back. 4. Once that's done, head on to the "Add/Remove Entries" page and select "Windows NT/2k/XP/2003" from the drop-down list, give it a name, then press "Add Entry" to finish. 5. Reboot. Windows XP Drive Option As of EasyBCD 1.7+, you won't be able to select the drive that your Windows XP entry points to. This is because EasyBCD will automatically search for NTLDR, the Windows XP bootloader, and pick the right drive for you. For more information, read the main Windows XP page. Finishing Up * If all has gone well (assuming you followed the directions here to a tee, there is no reason for it not to have), you should be presented with the Windows Vista boot menu when you restart your machine. * You'll have the old Windows Vista entry and the new Windows XP entry you created in the steps above. Selecting each should get you into the respecting operating system without a problem. * Feel free to run EasyBCD in either OS and customize your dual-boot by renaming entries, changing the default OS, and modifying the menu timeout.

Michael Jay
Michael Jay

and have not been doing so for long, our shop is strictly XP and we will probably be moving to Vista this spring or summer. That said I have had no problems with moving files between Vista and XP pc's or network drives. Is your non-Vista machine not a pc?