Security

Wal-Mart issues RFID mandate

Wal-Mart has decided to ratchet up the pressure on its 15,000 suppliers to comply with a 3-year-old inventory technology mandate. Beginning January 30, 2008, it will charge suppliers a $2 fee for each pallet without a RFID tag that is shipped to its Sam's Club distribution center in Texas.

Wal-Mart has decided to ratchet up the pressure on its 15,000 suppliers to comply with a 3-year-old inventory technology mandate. Beginning January 30, 2008, it will charge suppliers a $2 fee for each pallet without a RFID tag that is shipped to its Sam's Club distribution center in Texas.

The strategy is simple, according to InformationWeek:

It seems focused on turning its 700-store Sam's Club warehouse-outlet division into an example of RFID supply chain technology in action, down to requiring item-level RFID in 22 distribution centers by 2010. It makes sense: Sam's Club has far fewer suppliers than Wal-Mart stores, and customers buy products by the case, the pallet, or individual packages that are larger ... than what's typically sold in retail stores.

Sam's Club contributed $41.5 billion to Wal-Mart's $344.9 billion in revenue for the fiscal year ending in 2007.

The pallet fee comes as a surprise to some suppliers, though companies that already conform to Wal-Mart's RFID mandate are understandably smug about it. Some, like Daisy's information systems manager, Kevin Brown, attest to the benefits of RFID.

Still, is it right for Wal-Mart to enforce such a mandate? Do you reckon that RFID is ready for the main-stream?

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About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

67 comments
journeyer58
journeyer58

If a supplier wishes to do business with Wal-Mart,then they have to play by the rules set up by the business that they wish to supply. In point of fact, the reason that Wal-Mart uses RFID, is to cut down on the inventory that they have to keep in a given warehouse, so that they only have on hand what they absolutely need at any given time. With the coming market set-up, there will only be large conglomerates that control the available goods. Now, how are the consumers in this new market set-up to have buying power? We are not going to have as much say as we used to by dint of the fact of the large conglomerates using their large buying power. You may ask, what does this have to do with the larger corporations, using RFID? Well, this is their choice in controlling inventory and stock on hand. No conspiracy theories, but, behind it all, yes there is something afoot and that needs to be investigated, but just not here.

JCitizen
JCitizen

When I saw the totally underhanded methods they used to run small business off. I decided I didn't need to help them improve their monthly same store sales figures. They aren't even trying to offer the business service to the public that the small businesses they destroyed offered. If it wasn't for this tyrannical attitude, and if they actually cared about serving people while they made a profit, I might not be so hatefull. I go to Target, True Value, or any body NOT WallMart! The competition may not be much better, but at least they aren't run counteractive to the interests of the public. Besides the fact that they change the location of products inside the store every day, so you can run around like a monkey being jerked by your tail to find anything. Baahhh! A pox be upon the chairmen of the board! I always check online to make sure I can get the same product elsewhere. More and more I find the same product at a competitor for less cost; who needs Wally?

keith.f.shumaker
keith.f.shumaker

As a supplier of Wal-Mart and Sam's Club, I am already in compliance with sending RFID tagged product, but not at the item level. I understand that Wal-Mart will not achieve full benefits of RFID until all of it's suppliers tag all products shipped to Wal-Mart, but at the item level ,it will get very expensive for some suppliers. It makes a big difference to a company if they have to add $.20 per item if their product is a candy bar, versus if their product is a TV. Some companies have yet to adopt bar coding at their facilities let alone an RFID model. And for some, a $2 per pallet penalty is cheaper then installing an RFID process, so until the penalty increases, some will resist.

paulmah
paulmah

Still, is it right for Wal-Mart to enforce such a mandate? Do you reckon that RFID is ready for the main-stream?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I applaud your taking your business elsewhere. You're voting with your wallet, the most effective method of expressing your shopping preferences. However, that's also what millions of other consumers are doing. By shopping at Wal-Mart, they are expressing their preference for that store over smaller retailers. If all those people that scream when a Wal-Mart opened wouldn't change their shopping habits to include it, smaller local retailers would survive. You got to Target; how do they differ from Wal-Mart? They're a big box retailer with similar goals (make money) and similar methods of achieving them (retail sales that emphasize low prices at the expense of customer service, and achieve those prices through volume purchases at the lowest negotiable cost). What makes Wal-Mart unacceptable but Target okay? How about Best Buy, Stein Mart, Bass Pro Shops, PetSmart, and other "big box" retailers that compete with local electronics, clothing, bait and tackle, or pet shops? Why don't Applebee's or TGI Fridays catch the same flack when they open and the local grill goes under? Consumers ultimately decide what businesses survive, not their competition.

highlander718
highlander718

but untill 99% of the Americaqns will preffer to shop WM because of theri prices, I am afraid tehir snowball will just get bigger and bigger. I really blame the consumers in this one. My personal opinion is that WM is mostly bad, although recently they try to show a nicer face, they do spend an infitezimal (I guess) percenet of their revenue for charities and environmental initiatives, but I am afraid it just PR.

cowen80194
cowen80194

Walmart has so many contracts working on the project I am safe enough. RFID is walmarts next approach to theft detection. Once suppliers comply All product will be required to have a tag at supplier expense. The tag will allow automated inventory from the supplier to a DH center. From there the walmart trailers have RFID in them and can monitor when the doors are closed and opened and what stock is on a trailer using a back up VHF - and primary satellite transceiver on the nose of the trailer to track the shipment en route to the store. At the store rails at the docks read the stock as it is unloaded by fork lift and automatically inserts to the stock database. Receivers in the store monitor the stock and at the time of purchase tracking of the customer's information of the purchase by correlating it to the RFID tag. When exiting the store the Gate at the door is SUPPOSED to pick up the Tag compare it to inventory database and then SHOULD set the alarm off if it is stolen. I have also installed this same system at Lowes. Everything they sell is being tagged. The cool thing is when an employee has that special box that a customer picks up and pays for well the product that is paid for is ok but all the stock inside that is NOT PAID for set off the alarm. And a simple print out at the gate will show what is in the closed box. Really cool. Lowes pays for this though unlike Walmarts plan to stick it to the suppliers. Question why is Walmart still open? The primary import is china made and the lead issues have abounded. Why has Walmart not had to check for lead or stop importing. Could this be a combined plot with china to taint walmarts competitions stock? LOL my conspiracy .02. but really it is an interesting sub note.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I hear third- or fourth-hand reports that Wal-Mart has had technical problems with their RFID implementation. We've avoided doing anything with it on the theory that if Wally can't make it work effectively, well, their IT department is much bigger than ours. Have you heard anything like this? Don't answer if you think doing so would endanger your supplier relationship.

mike_patburgess
mike_patburgess

All major distribution points are automated. The pallet comes off of a truck, the RFID tag is scanned and a robot moves the pallet to a shelf a mile away and eight floors up. When area stores call for product, the request is sent to the distribution center, the computerized robot picks the pallet and ships it to the area that requested it. You either conform to the way Wall-Mart does business or you don't.

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

readers, and antennas for them plus software for the warehouse of the company sending them out are not. They can simply slap pre-programmed tags in the sending warehouse if they are not using them internally. As said they weren't requiring each item, just the pallets. that said, if the cost is more than $2/pallet to add the tags the company has the option to keep doing biz with Sprawl-Mart (Not a parody of Wal-Mart) and eat the $2 cost. For more expensive items this would be a very small percent of the total. They might be able to re-negotiate their contracts higher later tho walmart is a hard bargainer, they are forcing this on everyone so the competition would want to cover the cost too.

stephenmoriarty
stephenmoriarty

Wal-Mart?s RFID initiative started back in spring 2003. At the time I was working for a Packaging manufacturer. We were told to have it working by the end of the year by what was then a key Wal-Mart supplier, Gillette/Braun. We had been doing designing and re-packaging of an American/European product (Gillette/Braun OralB electric toothbrushes) The toothbrushes were from Europe and had German packaging with a RFID tag in the individual packages based on the European Standard RFID. We were replacing both the RFID chip as well as putting the product in American packaging, now if Wal-Mart was claiming it as an American built product is whole other issue. We were told that Wal Mart had already installed RFID antennas at their distribution centers (dockplates, etc). We used to assemble pallets with product and POP displays onto skids. The product had to have all ctns turned a certain way to be read by Wal-Mart?s antennas. We would ship them to one of Wal-Mart's testing centers to see if they could be read correctly at a pallet level. Wal-Mart was committed to using this is 2003, and has had infrastructure in place since then to support it. Gillette/Braun was also part of a little Wal-Mart test run back then on a consumer level back in 2004 This involved putting RFID antennas near product on the shelves to determine what customers were picking up the product off the shelves and reading the text on the package and whether or not they actually bought the product based on combination of RFID/UPC code scanned on checkout.

CheriS
CheriS

1) I feel more comfortable with Wal-Mart using RFID than having it sing the praises of my SSN and other identifying information in my passport! 2) Wal-Mart can require their vendors to do many things. Their ball field, ball, bat, and glove. Wal-Mart has MANY requirements of their vendors. This is just one. 3) Regarding the NAU -- That's what they said about NAFTA.

Larry the Security Guy
Larry the Security Guy

You have to play by their rules. I think Wal-Mart has every right to make and enforce this demand as long as their suppliers agreed to it in some fashion (contract, ambiguous terms, etc.). As for RFID being ready, it's a Catch-22 game. Adoption and readiness will happen as a result of each other. Wal-Mart, IMHO, took the first step and adopted it.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

The enforcement is at minimum placed on a pallet level. RFID is pretty much low cost, depending on the implementation. Except for more pricey items, I would doubt that they would mandate each item to be tagged, but it is a price of doing business with them.

Larryonwine
Larryonwine

NO! WHAT THEY WILL DO TO GET THERE OWN WAY. ANOTHER STEP OF BIG BROTHER.

solomon568
solomon568

Wal-Mart has the clout to do this, true. However, I don't trust Wal-Mart's moves. Presently, Wal-Mart is setting themselves up to circumvent the Teamsters in CA by setting up a distribution center in TX. There is a 10-lane super-highway under construction/developement right now in TX (called the Trans-Texas Corridor). This is set to parallel I-35 and is part of a huge network to supply super retailers (like Wal-Mart) with cheap, unsafe and inferior goods. The plan is to cut out the Teamsters and their transport fees. However, the transportation of goods from China would be handled by Mexican truckers who don't charge as much, lowering the price on costs, but creating a huge safety risk since the Mexican truckers aren't regulated in any way. Goods would enter Mexican ports (bypassing the Teamsters) and get to the Trans-Texas Corridor, from there the goods would be moved to super-retailers straight up through the middle o the country, into Canada. This is part and parcel of a much larger plan to create a North American Union, to be established in 2010. The NAU would erase the borders between the US, Canada and Mexico, creating a free trade zone - just like what has happened in Europe (European Union), Africa (African Union) and Asia (South Asian Union). The dollar is going to be trashed by this free trade zone along with the Consitution. The new currency will be the Amero. Use Google, Wikipedia and YouTube for more info. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3jdQxDC7pA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H65f3q_Lm9U http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuBo4E77ZXo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHMnUZ9kdGs http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOWKs-wC2ek I usually don't tell people what think when it comes to voting. I will say that you should probe any bills, referendums and proposals what would hurt Americans, our economy, our sovereignty and destroy our Constitution that so many have fought, bled and died for. Bush and Cheney have sold us all out for profit and control by the power elite. This includes the Walton Family, the Rockefellers, the Bush family and especially the Rothschilds - of which Pres. Bill Clinton is a member. That's why I don't trust Him, nor Hillary and her politics. Strange, but true. Think. This whole thing would not have been possible without NAFTA. The Security Prosperity Partnership (spp.org) has no Congressional oversight, no Congressional approval nor the approval of the American people! Investigate. Dig. Question. The New World Order is upon us. The USA is one of the last pieces of the puzzle. Don't let them take our freedoms and our way of life as well!

cpr
cpr

If the purchaser wants yellow paper, then if you want to keep their business, you will comply. I personally don't thing that rfid is 'there yet', but I know that the ultimate price will be paid by the consumer (as always).

a_vagga
a_vagga

RFID definitely is ready for the mainstream, per se, and very much proven in the supply chain. Its very important that the value of RFID in supply chain is well understood by the concerned personnel in all ranks of the various potential companies. This move from Wal-Mart will only help the regimentation of those who blindly comply but fail to register the benefits of RFID.

langmjm
langmjm

More than advance notice given. If they want the business they should comply. RFID has been around for 10-15 years.

crysmon
crysmon

These tags need to be put in a large scale environment, or we will never understand their true potential. Walmart has EVERY right to require this from its vendors. On the flip side, this technology is also being used by Walgreens vendors. In retail stores vendors make agreements with the company that their "special displays" will be up in the store. Using this RFID technology auditing for compliance has become effortless. (This might seem like no big deal, but in a retail store when a new display comes in, associates usually don't care and will only put it up WHEN and WHERE they want to. This can cause companies fines, and loss of vendors who have paid for placement of products.)

bperkins
bperkins

Sure it is OK for them to mandate the business rules between themselves and their vendors. If the vendors don't like it they can negotiate or refuse to do business with Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart has more clout, for sure, so most vendors will be wanting to play by these rules. But if a vendor has allowed itself to get to the point where if they lose Wal-Mart business they go under... that seems like bad business thinking to me.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I don't see it as anything different from how major retailers do business with vendors now. Depending on who is bigger but that's usually the retailer between the two and definately the retailer in terms of WalMart. Retailers and Vendors already degotiate product quantities, lead times, unit costs, packaging, shipping packs and interaction of information for order creation and/or system integration. Requiring RFID so that product properly interacts with the retailer's systems seems like the next natural step. It's no different than specifying the product tags which will be printed and attached to each unit.

royhayward
royhayward

Smaller, and less organized retailers don't. So I say, "it is right" because this technology will never be adopted or abandoned until it is really put in as a main stream process for a large supply chain system. Is it ready? Well that is what we are going to see as this moves forward. I personally thing that RFID technology has great possibilities and look forward to more wide spread adoption into the industries that I work in. But I digress....

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Paul, I don't understand your question. They're a business placing a requirement on their suppliers. This mandate is no more 'right' (or 'wrong') than any other contractual requirement. That said, no, I don't think it's ready for prime time yet. Edited - for several years I worked for a division of MTD (Cub Cadet, YardMan, other brands of outdoor power equipment including house or proprietary brands). One of our largest customers was Sears, and we made equipment for their Craftsman line. In the 1980's, Sears was where Wal-mart is now. When they had a product requirement, we shut up, met the specification, and cashed the checks.

JCitizen
JCitizen

with products that they put there just to put small local business upstarts out of business. Then they pull the shelves just as soon as said business fails. This is not serving the consumer public at all. It is just plain back stabbing greed. If they would end practices like this I might consider coming back; but then I would get tired of being jerked all over the store trying to find something that was in one place just yesterday and now is halfway accross the store. I don't like being treated like a rag doll step and fetch it! When you actually compare prices, the competitors beat them, except on the rare fishing lure price they put out occasionally to sucker you into the store so you can pay the other higher prices for all the rest of the items. I have no argument with Wally's competitors; high volume selling is the reality today. Ma and Pa Kettle can still get out there and sell to the public; they just have to be one step ahead of the managment and pick products that people want but Wally is incapable of throwing out on the shelves just to stab them in the back with.

mike
mike

With a Credit Card company you can Dispute a charge for $25 bucks or less (some companies have lower thresholds) and they will just write off the charge on your card. It is because it costs more (in a few instances) to dispute the charge in the first place that it actually costs the Credit Card company less to just write it off. However; if that particular customer has a history of disputing charges (like someone who has figured out the threshold limit) then they will start investigating the charges. But if it's your first dispute and it's less then the threshold then you'll more then likely just see the charge go away... Now, what does this have to do with RFID and Wal-Mart? Well, SAMS club can mandate the use of RFID on all items because 90% or more of their items are all Big, Bulky, or Multi Packaged. And it is for this reason that Wal-Mart itself has not mandated the use of RFID in "ALL" of the stock they sell. It makes NO sense to RFID a candy bar. a 20 cent RFID tag or even a 5 cent RFID tag on a 50 cent candy bar is rather cost ineffective and Wal-Mart knows that. But once you start getting up in price then that's where RFID comes into play.

mike
mike

I thought Big Brother was the Government. So now it's expanded to the Private Sector as well??? ;-)

OnTheRopes
OnTheRopes

One of the consequences of having time, a broadband connection and an inquisitive mind is being able to come to conclusions that others may find ridiculous. I find it interesting that it's difficult, if not impossible, to convince other people to think the way that I do about any given topic be it politics, religion or even what foods and vitamins are good for me. What I'm saying is that you can shout your beliefs, anger and outrage to the world and the world will most likely just tell you to shut the hell up. Expect it. One of the traits I admire is the ability of some people to persevere in their beliefs even if no one else agrees. You're unique as an individual and who am I or anyone else to say that you've got it all wrong? You might be the only person that has it all right. I'm not in a position to judge you. I suggest that you take a basic, maybe even an advanced course on RFID. There are some good, free courses on the web and there's a lot of information available right here at TR. I'm not going to direct you to any particular information as you have a mind of your own and apparently are using it for something more than just a hat-rack. Feel free.

JCitizen
JCitizen

neither one of them cares about the consumer. I've been in three unions and none of them gave a rat's @ss about the worker. All they did was get rid of our jobs and we were stupid for letting it happen. Until the unions get truely democratic so the worker can actually control them from the top down; I will continue to feel this way.

mike
mike

Took your advise and Googled it. Guess what... It's only logical to do this in the first place. Take a look at the map of Commerce going through Texas in the first place. The amount of traffic it would remove from the Texas Roadways would be immense. I gather that had Ron Paul been alive during the Trans-Canadian Highway he would have been up in arms about us all be Canuks'. But how else would you purpose to drive from Oragon to Alaska? The same people that believe in this "conspiracy" theory are the same that think the moon landings were done in Hollywood, Kennedy was shot by three men, and Elvis is still alive in Oklahoma. And if by some slim chance you're right and Ron Paul is as well, it would only serve the US right. The Union Mentality was great when businesses were known for taking advantage of their people but now the tide has turned. The people in the Unions are taking advantage of the businesses. The extortion on the end of the Union's is amazing. They tell you that they're helping you out and while you strike, they play golf. And if you don't want to be in a Union you still have to pay dues. Then, you have no say in what candidate your money supports from your dues. So please, stop with the conspiracy theory's and if you really want to bring jobs back to the USA stop making it beneficial for businesses to move in the first place. Pass a Fair Tax and make the US a more conducive place for business instead of an obstacle...

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"The New World Order is upon us." What does this sentence mean? Specifically, what's "The New World Order"? I confess I associate it with what I consider to be paranoid conspiracies, since I rarely see it used in any other context. However, I may be wrong or have received misinformation, so I've decide it's time I asked someone who uses the phrase what they mean by it. Thanks. EDITED: Oh, please don't recommend I Google or search for the phrase. I don't want a Wikipedia definition, I want to know what you, solomon568, mean by the phrase.

1,000_naymes
1,000_naymes

I agree, and Walmart *should* be implementing this new technology, along with other major importers who fill their shelves with goods that travel across international boundaries.

highlander718
highlander718

Whatever type of business you are in North America, loosing Wal-MArt as a client can be anything from bankruptcy to serious impact on your sales. Even giant multinationals have Wal-Mart in the 15%-20% zone of their business. I think that at that level loosing anything over 10% is big impact.

JCitizen
JCitizen

Bad thinking indeed. I agree with you bperkins; RubberMaid made one of the best products in America. Products I was willing to pay extra for because of the excellent design and quality. But WallMart ran them out of business because of their price point system. RubberMaid should have started their own online business and/or gone to the other big US retailers like Home Depot to sell at least in the US market. But just closing their doors because of Wally World's bullying was bad planning if you ask me. They had an excellent product; but got lazy in promoting and distributing it. Now they are online and I'd bet they will build their world market share back with out worrying about Unca'Wally's same store sales points.

smee63
smee63

then they would find somebody else who would.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

shouldnt be an issue at all, unless it contains personal information. I think that rfid has lots of real world potential, however, as stated previously, implants with personal info, cards with personal info should never be used. yup, never trust the security of your personal data on an rfid chip. I will agree all the way on that one.

JCitizen
JCitizen

If that is ever properly addressed, I wouldn't mind carrying that in my wallet(back side); but not under my skin!

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

to push a cart full of groceries past a reader and have it all totalled up in an instant. Pass an rfid key with coupons, and have it total the savings. I have no problem with that. However, I will refuse to be tagged myself....

mike
mike

Yes, some may loose their jobs. And yes, not everyone is a college graduate or even a canadate for collage. But there are a ton of vocation professions out there and wonderful technical schools. We've rested on our laurles enough as a country to the point that it sickens me to think a good portion of my tax dollars (my tax dollars, not the governments money, not the money of the people but MY MONEY) is going to support sloth and fatties watching Oprah on Cable TV but yet stand in a food line because they don't have enough money to buy groceries. But yet they use their food stamps to buy twinkles and little debbies... But we've allowed ourselves to become a country that accepts this and if you talk bad against anything for the "Children" or "well fare" you're an ogre with no heart. Well that's not the case. I give to the poor and the needy. I just don't like having my money extorted out of me at the point of a gun to pay 70% overhead for a program that might help 10% of the "Truly needy". It used to be in this country that if you lost a job you went looking for another, anywhere, for another job. The dust bowl created a mass migration to the west to find jobs. Most did not sit in their house thinking that they could grow wheat with dust and no water. But we spoon feed the masses now and if you dare think of injecting personal responsibility into the debate then you have to be some sort of bastard. Well guess what, call me a bastard because I think people should take care of themselves. If they physically / mentally can not that's one thing... but it's another thing to watch Food Stamps being used to buy crap instead of food, to watch more money get doled out to someone who spreads their legs without protection and pops out another kid, and the moronic daddies that create them... I got an idea, send those displaced from jobs because there are automated scanners at Wally World to Arizona. Give them basic shelter, a free ride on an airplane there with an in flight meal and some clothes. In return they work in those jobs that "Americans Won't Do" for two years, take job training classes, parenting classes, and education in how to use a condom... Then let's sit back and find out who are those that actually have pride in themselves and work and those that refuse because it would be easier to just live off of Well Fare...

mike
mike

Just giving another example of why you would not want to RFID a Sniker's... From another perspective that is...

CheriS
CheriS

I can see it now...Fill up your grocery cart and wheel out the door. On the way out the door the RFID on all merchandise is read, as well as the RFID implanted in your backside. Your purchases are totaled and billed to the account identified in your RFID. If you have selected the additional option (for a small convenience fee of $5.00) an email will be sent with the details of your transaction (with your email addy also on the RFID in your backside).

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Many people complain about Wal-Mart offering only low-wage jobs like bagging, cashiering, or counting inventory.

cowen80194
cowen80194

Some people can not do anything more then sack or work as a cashier or count inventory. This will start a trend to eliminate jobs the more its accepted. Oh sorry I am thinking of people not the bottom line again.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

yes, this can be very useful as well, but this uses passive rfid. Tracking pallets, etc. is likely using active rfid, which would be the preference for warehouse style inventory control. passive rfid chips are much cheaper, but they have a more limiting function. But yes, I do think theat they will be more dominent in the near future for scanning, especially on packaging that is harder to get the bar codes from.

cpr
cpr

RFID tags will also help at the cash checkouts (especially on individually targeted products). No longer will bar codes need to be manually read - the 'rfid reader' will obtain the signal(s) and automatically generate a sales list. Products may not need to be touched by humans at all. This all leads to a faster and more accurate cash register transaction and better customer service.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

and do not see where I didnt. Small items are much less likely to need rfid, except on pallets/cases. These can be more easily found, determined expiration dates (if any), and checked for inventory easier. It makes total sense why Sams Club would want to do this. While I have never been there, I am guessing it is like Costco. If so, then they have crap on shelves too high to reach without a ladder, whole pallets just sitting there, and in no particular order. This can be used to identify and locate said items. This has nothing to do with tagging for reducing theft, and is likely targeted at inventory management. This makes even more sense to use on items that expire. Because they can locate the next batch, and/or pull expiring items. I used to work in a grocery store, and if someone tucked a few boxes of something in a place where it was not easily found, newer items would hit the shelf. Then one day someone finds the old stuff and goes to put it out. It makes good sense to manage inventory...

mike
mike

They actually do a little more then just track inventory. They track what has the most tendency to sell. Yes, I know, that's tracking inventory however; they've used this information to great success. Like they found out the number one thing in a persons shopping cart at the Super Center's is bananas. So they decided to place bananas in more then just one section of the store. They placed them in Produce, then along other aisle ways along the grocery aisle. And they sold even more. They also use the database to find out what items normally lead to other purchases. Like if you buy motor oil will you also buy toilet paper. Again, a way to make sure that the items that sell get the most face time with the consumer... But I agree, this whole conspiracy crap with Wal-mart and RFID is about as interesting as the stuff I leave on the toilet paper before flushing it... which interestingly enough is exactly what I would like to do with the conspiracy theory's and those that perpetuate insanity by buying into that crap...

DanLM
DanLM

Then the goverment will ever be. Hell, who holds more information on any individuaal then private buisness's? From your likes/dislikes in purchase's to the type of pillows you like on your bed in a hotel room. Now, this crap these people are trying to feed about Wall Mart and rifd chips is just that... Crap. Walmart is traking inventory. Nothing more, nothing less.. Some people just don't have a clue. Simple as that. Dan

JCitizen
JCitizen

is probabley directly related to the RFID issue here. The way they constantly shift produce around in the store almost daily; they probably have a hard time keeping track of it with that retail tactic. I just can't get excited about their problems in that area because that is precisely one of the most negative things I have experienced as a former customer.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

While business operate to make money, providing value is one of the best ways to do it. But 'value' is relative. Apparently there are plenty of people who feel Wal-Mart provides them value.

JCitizen
JCitizen

As the customer is the one that seeks that value, they won't come into the store without it. Union workers that won't work won't satisfy the customer; Wally World won't offer the customer value; customer goes away. I will endeavor to avoid both like the pox!

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Wal-Mart isn't in business to care for the consumer. Neither is any other business. They're in business to make money for their shareholders, period. This isn't good or bad, it's what businesses are about. Unions aren't interested in the consumers either. In theory they're about protecting the jobs of their members. Whether they're doing that is debatable, but neither unions nor businesses should be criticized for not looking out for consumers. You might as well criticize birds for not looking out for lizards; it's not their job.

mike
mike

Steel and CONCRETE... big difference. Plus, the Empire State Building did not have to endure the heat from the spilled fuel like the Twin Towers. PLUS... The Twin Towers were designed to take the impact of the largest jet at the time and guess what, IT TOOK THE IMPACT... The heat from the burning fuel weakened the steal. Actually talk to a STRUCTURAL ENGINEER and you'll find out what happened because of the flames. If you're committed to believing that it was an inside job, any other explanation will be dismissed as "a fictional BS story". 7 held a 6000 gallon diesel tank on the 2nd floor that was compromised as well as a few more on lower floors. The building was damaged from falling debris and it did burn for hours. Then lines fed the Mayors Emergency Response center on the 7th floor. To put it another way, the building was not designed to be a torch.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"...wouldn't rather err on the side of caution rather than risk what could be coming?" There are only so many things in the world I can worry about. I prioritize them and worry about them in order of the likelihood of their happening, of the personal consequences, and of my ability to affect them. Auto accidents take priority over boat accidents; they're more likely, the personal consequences are high, and I can affect the possibility (drive defensively, get insurance). Bee stings are much less likely, but the personal consequences are quite high (I'm allergic), and I can affect the outcome (I carry an ephedrine auto-injector). Being hit by a meteor is a low priority; while the personal consequences are quite high, it is much less likely than being stung, and there's nothing I can do to affect it. I regard the likelihood of this "conspiracy" as lower than a bee sting, as having no personal consequences, and nothing I can affect. If someone will provide actual hard scientific physical evidence, I'll evaluate it. Not videos, not hindsights, not retrospectives, not historic speculation; solid physical evidence.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

what does rfid tags on pallets have to do with the WTC falling? I am really lost now. Ok, if Wal-Mart were trying to implant rfid chips in all of its workers, then I might be able to follow your reasoning a bit, but they arent (not now at least). If you have some actual input for the original topic, please comment. If you just have rantings and conspiracies, we have a few others for whom you can contact. Please take these to relevant discussions. OR -- show us how these rfid chips are going to make Wal-Mart rule the world? P.S. Do you beleive EVERYTHING that you see on YouTube?

solomon568
solomon568

I would love to be proven wrong about what I'm seeing come together here. But tell me something, wouldn't rather err on the side of caution rather than risk what could be coming? I'd hate to be saying coulda/woulda/shoulda if this ever came to pass. I understand that everyone may not believe what I see, that's fine. However, wouldn't it be wise to make sure that it doesn't happen, even in the unlikely chance (from your view) that it might? I want this country to stay strong and get stronger because of our own choices and our own struggles and goals, not the goals that someone else has for their own selfish and greedy reasons to destroy our way of life. Have you looked at the YouTube links that I've provided earlier? have you asked yourself why Bldg 5 fell when it wasn't hit by a plane? Fact: No steel frame structure has ever fallen because a plane has hit it. That includes the Empire State Bldg. BTW, the WTC, were designed to WITHSTAND A PLANE COLLISION! WHY DID IT FALL???

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

because you read the article you know all about rfid??? or yes you do, because you read the article and it says Wal-Mart it is totally evil??? I try avoiding Wal-Mart, and never been to Sam's Club. But this stretch is really off the wall. Putting an rfid tag onto pallets/product is not going to bring the world to its knees, or overthrow the govt's so that Wal Mart will rule everything. Read my post here http://techrepublic.com.com/5208-12844-0.html?forumID=102&threadID=251469&messageID=2409291 while a bit light, it covers it well.

solomon568
solomon568

Yes I do. I've already read the article.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

having Pallets of product tagged with an rfid chip??? I think it is to manage stock/inventory. I am straining my brain trying to figure out what your interpretation is. Do you have a clue as to what rfid is???

solomon568
solomon568

The New World Order phrase has been around for a long time, check the back of your $1 bill. You will see "Novus Ordo Seclorum" which translates as "New World Order." Until recently, I thought that this was just an empty slogan. That is until I found some very disturbing information about the most sinister plan of the power elite. There has been a plan in the works for the longest time. This plan has made Saddam Hussein a target long before 9/11, because he took his own country's oil and used it to build Iraq. The Rothschilds owned the Iraq Oil Company who wanted that oil back. The Ba'ath Party, of which Hussein was a member was the target of the war. Now, there is an oil pipeline to the Caspian Sea for this oil. The assassination attempt of Hugo Chavez was part of this plan. Question: What is the chief export of Venezuela? Answer: Oil. That's why they want to kill him. Bush/Cheney is doing their bidding because the Bush family, along with the Rockefellers, the Waltons and the other power elite. The building of bases, trashing the US economy and the dollar, 9/11 being planned, the EU, the African Union, the South Asian Union, Bush's refusal to enforce the borders and the creation of the North American Union. Watch the YouTube clips above. There's more information, but that's a start.

JCitizen
JCitizen

but I hate WalMart so vociferously that I take every opportunity to bad mouth them. This is coming from someone who met Sam Walton and liked him; but when he passed away, the board member vultures took over (as is true of all corporations). And sadly has gone slowly down hill since.

kknepple
kknepple

and not really discussing the RFID technology. I agree with you about RubberMaid this is a bad story and unfortunately is not the only company that has been affected by Wal-Mart. The one way to fix it is to not shop there.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

And they'd have every right to. It's their money.

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