After Hours

When will Blu-Ray hit your data center?

Sony has finally won a format war and redeemed itself from the Betamax debacle in the 1980s. The immediate impact will certainly be in the consumer market, but it won't be long before the technology makes it into computers and data centers.

Sony has finally won a format war and redeemed itself from the Betamax debacle in the 1980s. The immediate impact will certainly be in the consumer market, but it won't be long before the technology makes it into computers and data centers. The win was also impressive given the weight that Microsoft threw behind HD-DVD. John C. Dvorak said, "I am convinced that this whole HD DVD vs. Blu-Ray format war debacle was a scheme for Microsoft to mess with Sony."

R.I.P. HD DVD (PC Mag)

The HD DVD "fire sale" has already started at retailers carrying the format, with some giving the players away in order to sell the media at half price. Amazon is selling HD movies for half price, even as Blu-Ray prices have jumped dramatically in some cases.

Format War is Over (Techie Diva)

How much data will fit on a blu-ray disc? (blu-ray.com)

I am looking forward to Blu-Ray to make it into computers as the discs store 50 GB (eventually expandable to 200 GB), which will be a major boon for archiving data, giving us much better options for storing large amounts of static data. Backup tapes are an awful, unreliable medium for storing archived data. Since we have so much data that is best stored on an optical medium, it is nice to see the standard solidify. Will you begin to use Blu-Ray for data storage in the near future?

8 comments
AlaniPhantom
AlaniPhantom

couldn't agree with you more. Blu Ray Is the de facto optical storage and archiving platform. Both at the enterprise and consumer spaces. Furthermore, yes Blu Ray has hit the Data Center. We currently ship a few hundred blu ray optical libraries every quarter and the number is fast rising. This has been due to the increased storage costs and the need to further reduce fixes/static data siting on primary and secondary disk based storage and backup clusters. Alani Kuye Phantom Data System Inc. Norwalk, CT Optical Storage Experts http://phantomdatasystems.com/bluraydisc.html

Andy Moon
Andy Moon

As a public institution, we archive so much data for long term storage that blu-ray could seriously reduce the volume that the archived data takes up. I haven't been invested at all in the format war (I wasn't even going to consider buying one until the standard solidified) except that I wanted it to end to reduce uncertainty. Now that blu-ray won, it shouldn't be that long before more manufacturers start making the devices, reducing the price to the point that inclusion in mid-range computers will be feasable. Do you see a need for the dense optical data storage that blu-ray provides?

ChewyBass
ChewyBass

What kind of write speeds are we looking at? I know with a standard dual layer disk it can take up to 45 minutes to burn 8 Gb's. I can't imagine on waiting for 200 Gb's to burn.

Ardanos
Ardanos

in Blu-Ray FAQ: "According to the Blu-ray Disc specification, 1x speed is defined as 36Mbps. However, as BD-ROM movies will require a 54Mbps data transfer rate the minimum speed we're expecting to see is 2x (72Mbps). Blu-ray also has the potential for much higher speeds, as a result of the larger numerical aperture (NA) adopted by Blu-ray Disc. The large NA value effectively means that Blu-ray will require less recording power and lower disc rotation speed than DVD and HD-DVD to achieve the same data transfer rate. While the media itself limited the recording speed in the past, the only limiting factor for Blu-ray is the capacity of the hardware. If we assume a maximum disc rotation speed of 10,000 RPM, then 12x at the outer diameter should be possible (about 400Mbps). This is why the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) already has plans to raise the speed to 8x (288Mbps) or more in the future."

Ardanos
Ardanos

Lets keep things real. 800GB per tape: ok 150GB/s: you must have swap a M for G. That tape gives 80MB/s uncompressed and 160MB/s compressed. Blue-ray is just starting to develop and with the current standard it gives 6X recording speed of 27 MB/s. You might recall the first DVDs with the amazing speed of 2x... So by the end of the year we should see the blue-ray closer to its potential: 12x at 54 MB/s. With the clear advantage in seek times a disk has over tape. About capacity, 4 layer disk are already being produced (100GB). On the down side, current drives only support 10 layers, therefore 250GB it the most you can have with player based on profile 1.1 (profile 2.0 is in development)

w
w

How you even try to compare 50GB to Tape. HP LTO 3 800GB per tape approx 150GB / SEC backup speed. I'll be home watching my bluray movie while you are swapping media.

Ardanos
Ardanos

From what I've reed it would be about 50 years, but in less then 10 years you'll have better/faster storage options and BR should be ending it's commercial cycle. Just notice the smaller time frame of availability in every format... Interesting discussion on a similar subject: http://forums.creativecow.net/archivethread/11/593887

sonotsky
sonotsky

...and I *haven't* forgotten basic math, that works out to a 50GB disk burned to capacity in ~50.5 minutes. I could live with that. My big quesion is, what's the burned shelf life of a BD-R and a BD-RW?